https://www.duolingo.com/yaliyev

"Kein Hund, kein Fahrer"

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March 5, 2013

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/moz.
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I thought kein meant something like "no/not + a" so I translated it as "Not a dog, not a driver." What would be the correct German senetence for my translation?

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tuuky
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Can anyone explain this phrase, please? Is it an idiom?

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kyky
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It's not an idiom but a listing.

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tuuky
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Thank you! I was trying to apply some deep philosophical meaning to it but couldn't come up with anything ;)

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kyky
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:) Without context, it doesn't make much sense.

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rickhardt

Looks like a normal sentece here

July 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/yaliyev
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I think the pronounciations of V and F are same in german. Or maybe there is some difference which can be noticed only by native speackers!

March 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kyky
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It depends on the word. For /f/ <v> was used originally (like "Vogel"). Then there were loanwords with <f> for /f/ (like "Fenster") and loanwords with <v> for /v/ (like "Vanille"). Originally /v/ is written with <w> (like "Wasser").

March 5, 2013
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