1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "毎週びょういんへ出かけます。"

"毎週びょういんへ出かけます。"

Translation:I go out to the hospital every week.

June 16, 2017

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMark15

I also like to live dangerously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harli

"to hospital" without "the" is marked incorrect. We often say it without "the" in NZ English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denzel-dave

In UK English, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

You guys also say Mackers when it's clearly McDonalds


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eromeon

From what I understand. Without the article, it means that you are going to be hospitalized, but with it, it means that you are going to visit. Does the Japanese sentence have both meanings? Or which one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

What it means depends on where you live.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

Guys, if I were using an app made and maintained by a country which goes to hospital and to university, I would have no trouble quickly using and adapting to that usage (and maybe even get a smile out of becoming "bidialectal." But as it is, it's American born and maintained, and sorry for that, but it's tough for the developers to enter every dialectal variant into the program when there are more pressing issues to fix. Duo is free (although after several years of use I've decided to kick in) and there is such a thing (in all of our dialects) as looking a gift horse in the mouth, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikkox

Who goes out to the hospital ? If I go out, it's out of the hospital... Just like people are taking a hike or a visit... Or they just go to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lcsondes

In the UK, many hospitals have shopping areas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swallama

Whaaaat? That's interesting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

We do to in the States. A place where you can buy teddy bears or flowers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PStrotman

Yes, but those are only for convenience. If you wanted any of the things you could get in a gift shop and were not already in a hospital you'd never go there to buy something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASleepingRock

I remember seeing a straight up conbini inside the big Tomisato hospital near Narita station... still overpriced like its non-hospitilized cousins outside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

An expensive コンビニ?I didn't think those existed haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NullJay

I see why Pokemon has that too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasTobin2

Even in developing country like mine some (mostly private) hospitals had convenience stores either inside the building or a few meters across the street.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesMoulang

I've never encountered this in the UK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I do see where you are coming from, and "go out to the hospital" is not what I would immediately think of. Nor do I know of a hospital in the US where you would go out to go shopping (there are shops, but as Aelianos said, generally for those visiting people in the hospital). In some regions in the US, though, I might say go out to the hospital if the hospital is out of town. I live in a city, for instance, and teach in a school in a suburb, or maybe a sort of exurb. I often say "go out to the campus" or "go out to the school." If I knew someone in a suburban hospital, I can certainly picture telling someone that I went out to it once a week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/secret_sAndwich

The lingot is for your clearly maniacal dedication to world domination through linguistics.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raiesh

You deserve one too for that hilarious comment!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

Thank you for this reasonable explanation. My first thought upon seeing this sentence was "Party at the hospital'? Go out in English sounded like a social engagement to me.

However, when my dog was dying, I often drove out to the animal hospital that was about 90 minutes away from my home.

In Japanese, dekakeru to go out, leave home 出かける. So, it doesn't seem to have any of the implications that I was carrying around in my head when I saw the English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beebee201909

maybe they work there on casual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xyvyrianeth

You might go to visit somebody you know who's in the hospital and has been for a long time..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

That was my FIRST thought. I guess the commenters here never had anyone in long term care. If the hospital were on the outskirts of town and I went to visit my critically ill grandmother, yes I would go out to the hospital every week (to visit her.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloArias470876

Agree. Technically is a correct translation but bit the best translation. It should be: I go to the hospital every week, even though it is not using the been to go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaunTomerlin

Mai is listed as also meaning "each", so wouldn't, "I go to the hospital each (as opposed to every) week," also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James483647

Yes, that would be fine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magycmyste

I tried that, too, but it isn't accepted. I reported it, because I think this should still work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Is Duo on dialysis? D:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medusa747

Duo reminds me of the animation style of the cartoon, Cyberchase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian611346

Could this also mean "Every week I go out of the hospital"? or would that only apply for the word for Exit "deru"


[deactivated user]

    Nope, the particle へ indicates an action towards something or a direction. In this case it's going out towards the hospital.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

    What Brian suggested (and I wrote) would require "de," right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara166383

    から, actually


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSly

    I've associated 出かける to mean "to go on an excursion," so putting 病院(びょういん)へ in front would mean "head out to the hospital."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeaganHanes

    This is true in a more colloquial sense for the term, but the concept of going to the hospital as an excursion/outing is a bit... grim. I doubt you would really see this in common formal usage :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rennah7

    They could be a dedicated volunteer visiting infirm patients?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goren17

    That's a weird place to "go out" to, but whatever floats your boat…


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boo913

    When would you use 出かけます over 行きます、and reverse? What's the nuance of each?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/canaanscurse

    The doctor came today. He told me I could go home for a short stay.

    It’s not that I'm getting better. It’s just that this may be my last chance...

    I think you know what I mean...

    Even so, I'm glad to be coming home. I've missed you terribly.

    But I'm afraid, James. I'm afraid you don't really want me to come home.

    Whenever you come see me, I can tell how hard it is on you...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reasor

    What is the difference between "I go to the hospital every month" and "I go out to the hospital every month"?

    Is it that one implies being in poor health and the other implies charity?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drkurush

    I think it has something to do with the fact duo drinks every night, maybe?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ObitoSigma

    Maybe you should stop drinking every night.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kittycat2223

    I put "I go out every week to the hospital." And it marked it as incorrect


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashley457984

    I put 'leave for'. They have some kinks to work out, but it's still a great app


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    "Go out to" just sounds strange to me.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nexus227

    Go out to the ball game!.... nvm


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margaret711539

    What does this sentence mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dessertandtea

    "I go to the bank" is accepted while in this question it is wrong and "go out "is required. Is there any difference


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/subhranilg

    May you recover fast


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

    I'd learned 出かける as "to leave the house", but it wouldn't accept "Every week I leave home for the hospital".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

    The unspoken backstory here wow


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike899735

    I actually regularly go to a hospital every two weeks, i would say:- まいにしゅびょういんへ行きます。I go out to seems a strange translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElinneaG

    Would it be correct to say "I will go out to the hospital every week" or would that be a different sentence in Japanese?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HalfPurr

    Sounds like the vocal includes a に before へ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

    Is "I go off to the hospital every week" really all that bad?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

    "I go out to the hospital every week"? what does this mean?

    Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.