1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "かれのおねえさんは大学生です。"

"かれのおねえさんは大学生です。"

Translation:His older sister is a college student.

June 16, 2017

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Ane, ani, imooto, otooto, haha, chichi, baba, jiji are used for your own family. Oneesan, oniisan, imooto, otootosan, okaasan, otousan, obaasan, ojiisan are used when talking about someone else's family members OR if you are being polite/nice to your own family members eg. Like the difference between Mum and mother, Dad and father, bro or sis and brother or sister. Also, you might refer to someone older than you - a friend/someone you're familiar with as your oneesan or oniisan. And people regularly address elderly people regardless of whether they know them or not as obaasan and ojiisan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBreadQueen05

THANK YOU SOOOOO MUCH!!!! THAT HELPS ALOT!!!! TvT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadezhdaSm3

Thanks! It's VERY helpful


[deactivated user]

    What's the difference between あね and おねえさん?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elfriede_malze

    You use あね when your talking to other people about your older sister. You would use お姉さん (おねえさん) when talking to someone about their own older sister. Additionally, you can also use お姉さん when speaking to your older sister directly, like a title.

    あの人は、お姉さんですか? [Is that person your older sister?]

    私のあねは大学生です。 [My older sister is a college student.]

    姉さん、今何時? [Sister, what time is it now?]

    The お makes it a bit more polite.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kezzoa

    Formality and respect.

    かのじょはわたしのあねです。 [talking to someone, she is my older sister]

    おねえさん、ただいま。[to your older sister, big sister, I'm home]

    Similar in difference between お母さん(おかあさん) and 母(はは).

    Generally, words that start with お and are about a person, お母さん 、お父さん、お姉さん、お兄さん、お医者さん、etc are about respect.

    At least that's my understanding of it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

    彼の御姉さんは大学生です。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    Note that the お- honorific prefix in お姉さん is usually written in kana, rather than kanji.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamScott794079

    Funny that the japanese for "college" littarely means big school


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jbrizzler

    I think the meaning here is more "great" than "big"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanAlvare405279

    "University" and "big sister" should be accepted as they are synonymous of "college" and "older sister"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnesLee7

    The translation should be, his older sister is acollege student.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveMail

    So what would I write differently if I just wanted to say "His sister is a college student" ? Does Japanese have a word for just "sister" ? If not, then both Duolingo and your translations would be correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    shimai - sister, kyoudai - brother/siblings (this is quite common in many languages where the masculine can mean brother or sibling/s). I like that Japanese has specific words for older brother/sister and younger brother/sister. Incidentally oniisan/oneesan can be used to refer to a close friend or a close family friend, often older than you - just like in English when you have close friends and your children refer to them as Auntie and Uncle even though you're not related to them at all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jam819886

    Why is "university student" not accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roztastic

    'uni student' should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrionSatore

    Guys just asking or is it a bug, what is the diffrence between college and university in japanese?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leliel5

    Neither are japanese terms. The english translation of 大学 is ambiguous, because there's really several distinct english dialects, with different terms for the place the highest level of education happens at.

    In american english, it would be college. In british english (and most of the english speaking commonwealth) it would be university.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapchee

    americans don't say "university student", they use "college student" instead


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    But OrionSatore is asking about what terms Japanese people use - not Americans.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

    This should help, both as to the terminology and, perhaps more significantly, concretely what the things are the terminology references: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higher_education_in_Japan


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos890478

    彼のお姉さんは大学生です。


    [deactivated user]

      I wrote everything right but instead of "college" i said "university"....it marked it wrong. I'm confused.

      Before it was "university" now apparently is college. Can someone please explain?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peggy500859

      University student should be correct


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashasei

      Maybe i'm just mis-reading this but where is everyone getting "his" from? Is there a masculine denotation i am missing?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elfriede_malze

      かれ means "he," but by adding on the の, it makes possessive -- "his."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtemisFow2

      Yeah, whilst skimming over the sentence, my brain confused it as kanoujyo.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elenloth

      How would you say "her", then? I thought kare had no gender.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      kare - he, kanojo - she. Possessive - noun/pronoun + no - kare no = his. kanojo no = her.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stk252

      In another exercise it counts wrong when I put "sister" instead of "older sister" for おねえさん and in this one it only gives me the option to put "sister", no "older sister" available. Wtf?!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      Duolingo is consistently inconsistent.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJammin234988

      Doesnt give me "older" as an option.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xRavelle

      What's the reason for specifically adressing the age of your sibling or someone elses sibling? It seems irrelevant.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      The reason is that the Japanese words mean specifically that - so, not irrelevant but rather accurate translation. いもうと(さん) - younger sister, おとうと(さん) - younger brother, おねえさん (あね) - older sister, おにいさん (あに) - older brother. English may not have words specifically point out the age of our siblings but Japanese does.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PachecoLara

      Can someone explain me this sentence?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      What is it exactly that you want explained or that you are struggling to understand?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapchee

      This is probably due to the fact that I don't know the US or Japanese school system, but what is the difference between university student and college student?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      My understanding is that university and college mean the same thing HOWEVER in The States College is more commonly used to mean University. In NZ College is sometimes used to mean high school but never University. I am guessing that the same goes for Spanish as colegio refers to high school and universidad to university. But I have also learnt something new from piguy3's comment about colleges encompassing a broader definition of tertiary education institutions. In NZ our tertiary education institutions are University and Polytech (Polytechnic), although there are other institutions that offer more specialised or focused curriculum like Arts Schools, Schools specifically for Hospitality, Hairdressing etc etc


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

      In the U.S. "college" refers to "university" pretty much only in the expressions "college student," "in college," "go to college" (there might be a few others). These do happen to be very common expressions, but outside these limited contexts, the words are actually even more different than I mentioned above. In fact, "universities" are made up of "colleges": College of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering, College of Agriculture, College of Business are constituent elements of a university. (The word "school" is also used in this way: law school, business school, medical school.)

      Education, and higher education perhaps even more so, is one case where native speakers of English from different countries might just as well be speaking different languages half the time (which tends to make the relevant portions of Duolingo trees o so fun, and confusing).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      Yes, we also use law school and medical school in this way - but they are still part of a university. Also, I forgot that we DO use college in a tertiary education situation - we have college of education - where you study to become a teacher at any level - early childhood right through to secondary school level. But in the city that I live in the college of education has become part of the University.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

      In the US, the term "university student" simply isn't used much. "College student" is used in its stead. In principle, "college student" is a little broader, encompassing students in post-secondary educational institutions that aren't universities (e.g. liberal arts colleges and community colleges). I have no idea if there are any similar distinctions within Japanese higher education.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapchee

      so actually it's my english then XD thanks!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kairu260485

      Cant believe i got this right


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nalinda7

      Elder sister is more accurate than older sister


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keko376337

      彼のお姉さんは大学生です


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XPK15

      Duolingo has to stop using ひらがな for everything.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/F3ytouched

      I put it in correctly, character for character and it marked me wrong...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanHollis4

      SO apparently DL thinks there's a difference between "O" "nesan" and "Onesan" ... not impressed. This is the third time this has happened in a week.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

      It's actually oneesan お ね え さん


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/touhoku

      University student should be accepted -.-


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hendry814867

      THIS LESSON SO HARD


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torianak

      is 「彼のお姉さんは大学生です」 wrong? Duolingo says it's wrong :/


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevin711542

      Why after many wrong submissions do I get the English translation only? Is this a bug in mine only or in the program?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kowalstein

      Ain't college student and university student the same thing!!!!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weneh

      Why doesn't かれのお姉さんは大学生です work?

      Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.