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https://www.duolingo.com/Dagobertinchen

pitch-black + pitschnass

The other day I said to my husband something with "pitch-wet" and realised eventually thanks to his puzzled facial expression, that this word doesn't exist in English.

It dawned to me that I borrowed the "pitch" from black.

Today I talked to myself (in my native German language) and said "pitschnass" - which is: pitch-wet! And now I can see where my confusion came from the other day.

Anyone here with a good etymology book about the English "pitch" and the German "pitsch"? :)

1 year ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Oritteropo1
Oritteropo1
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I can help with one half. Wiktionary often has etymologies.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pitch

The English pitch (as in sticky black stuff) derives from the Latin pix (the German Pech has the same derivation) which it claims derives from the proto indo-european word for resin.

Rather unfortunately it doesn't list the etymology of pitschnass.

https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/pitschnass

Perhaps the etymology of one of the synonyms platschnass or klitschnass would give some hints?

p.s. Pitch as in toss (or cricket-pitch) has a different derivation, it's from middle English picken where it normally meant the same as in German, but could also mean thrust.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.Gregor
E.T.Gregor
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I have no source, but I would guess that all of these are onomatopoeia for the sound of something falling into water.

1 year ago