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  5. "たのしくないですか?"

"たのしくないですか?"

Translation:Isn't it fun?

June 16, 2017

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Are you not entertained?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morvan82

Came here to say that, and found that you had beaten me to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrLoewe

"Is it not fun?" is also okay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomsAquino4

I translated this as "Are you having fun?". I feel like it should be accepted, given that earlier in the course we learn this type of construction as a polite (indirect) way to ask this type of question, and if I remember correctly this type of translation is used then. I agree that Are you not having fun?, or Is it not fun? are more direct translations though. Feedback would be appreciated on what you think is the more idiomatic translation.


[deactivated user]

    Hi Tomás,

    In this case the sentence uses the negative 楽(たの)しくないですか which indicates it's like the English "Aren't you having fun?" Compare to 楽しいですか which would be more like what you said, "Are you having fun?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

    With all due respect Josh, I think Tomas understands how the negative affects direct/literal translation, but was wondering how to differentiate (in Japanese) this literal usage from the idiomatic/indirect usage.

    To which I say: context, and vocal tone/stress are the main deciding factors.

    Consider a little extra context:

    ・どうしたの?楽しくないですか? "What's wrong? Are you not having fun?"

    vs

    ・あ、サイコー!楽しくないですか? "Yeah, this is awesome! Isn't this fun?"

    The first example is pretty cut and dry. The negative question is literal and intended to elicit a factual response from the listener. In terms of tone/stress, in general, I think the stress is on the な and the か has an upward inflection.

    The second example is less straightforward. Here, it is intended more like a rhetorical question or a soft declarative ("this is so fun"), and the expected response is more open-ended than a flat-out yes/no. In this case, I believe the stress is on the の with downward inflection for the rest of the phrase.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

    楽しく無いですか


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Namless2

    Ive only ever seen this phrase written as "楽しくないですか"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juanmolt

    Pretty sure "無" is unnecessary and is written in kana.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candy580365

    This isn't not unfunny, guys.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanshin

    "Isn't is fun?" Is another way to think of this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azaius

    I understand this as a short version of:

    "あなたはこれが楽しくないですか?"

    With the first part left out due to context. So it would literally translate as:

    "As for you, is this not enjoyable?"

    a.k.a. "Is this not fun for you?" a.k.a. "Are you not having fun?"

    Is this a good way to look at it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    Or "isn't it fun?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    It should be tanoshimu - to have fun/enjoy.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MakaiLawso

    How would you literally translate this? I thought it would be closer to 'unspecified is not fun?'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat173495

    I put "Is it not enjoyable?" and was marked wrong. But is it really wrong, and if so, why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qdc9ucveq0cveup

    So is it a question that expects a "Yes, it is fun" from the guy being questioned, or is it just a neutral question?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

    It depends. Taken from one of my previous answers:

    Context, and vocal tone/stress are the main deciding factors.

    Consider a little extra context:

    *どうしたの?楽しくないですか? "What's wrong? Are you not having fun?"

    vs

    *あ、サイコー!楽しくないですか? "Yeah, this is awesome! Isn't this fun?"

    The first example is pretty cut and dry. The negative question is literal and intended to elicit a factual response from the listener. In terms of tone/stress, in general, I think the stress is on the な and the か has an upward inflection.

    The second example is less straightforward. Here, it is intended more like a rhetorical question or a soft declarative ("this is so fun"), and the expected response is more open-ended than a flat-out yes/no. In this case, I believe the stress is on the の with downward inflection for the rest of the phrase.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

    Here we go again with the double negatives

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