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  5. "There are eight chairs."

"There are eight chairs."

Translation:椅子が八つあります。

June 16, 2017

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robmcmanmon

So I'm all for learning to read the kanji, but why is there no Furigana on display, or better yet a button to turn it on or off?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigLeade

Yeah, I think it would be good to show the pronunciation in hiragana when you tap on a kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

What is "Furigana"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishana92

kanji written in hiragana (pronunciation for said kanji)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amodeus_R.

Actually, furigana is specifically the reading on top of a kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

If you press/click on any of the words in the question, you'll get a little menu with all the kanji words for it + the hiragana spellings. Ex: if you press on "I" or "me", you'll get a menu that says 私 (わたし)、僕 (ぼく)、俺 (おれ)。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlebicko

Well ,I think that if you turn the romaji in the settings it will show the pronunciation in roman letters so hope that helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NineTailedFoxxy

I'm so confused about where the numbers go. Previous ones accepted it before が but it says otherwise in this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

As a rule of thumb, numbers go before the verb, without any particles between them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMarkov

Why did it accept it the other way around earlier? An error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

If it is placed in front, it has to be 八つのいすがあります. Needs a の particle. But the most natural one is to place the count directly before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Widdershyn

Again, other times have accepted that format. From what I've learned in class the number should be able to go in front if the object without a の since it's in the format of a counter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

Asking the same here : why 九つタブルがあります works in the previous one then ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

It would be very unnatural to put a counter before a noun without の in between.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

I don't use の, and it accepts it. I even wrote 八つ椅子があります in google translate, and it said "there are eight chairs" instead of giving me a zero wing style translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

Google translate should never be used as a resource for grammar. It will often try to shoehorn the closest possible meaning onto something even if it is entirely incorrect.
https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-counters-guide/#using-japanese-counters-in-grammar

https://www.wasabi-jpn.com/japanese-grammar/how-japanese-counting-systems-work-in-a-sentence/

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese/Grammar/Counters

Many particles tend to be dropped from casual speech, but that doesn't mean it is grammatically correct to do so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LajtaiLeve

Sometimes it accepts "number object (ga) there are", other times it only accepts "object (ga) number there are". Why is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patfan1683

Why is 「八つ椅子があります」 wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ERN1919

The number needs to go after the "ga"

Chairs (ga) eight there are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigLeade

This word order worked fine for 七つテーブルがあります。(There are seven tables.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VigorousJammer

Exactly. Before the "ga" is the subject, so your example sentence seems to be saying something like "it is an eight-chair"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gullaffe

No that would be です. I do think that word order should work. You are basically using the counter as an adjectives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

How do you pronounce the Japanese for "eight pieces"? It uses a different word than "hachi" (?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrentSe7en

How did you know when to pronounce it differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

When we count with つ the pronunciation has a different system from when other counters are used. Please check http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/complete/counting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMarkov

はつ. It isn't always "eight pieces", too, it is used most often as "eight" in the context of counting general objects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

Thank you for your explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricReyesP

Why is it が instead of は?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarteRouge

I think it can be both, since it is a nuance distinction that is not apparent in the english. But it does not accept は


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJammin234988

Seems like it might help if we learn these "piece" (tsu) numbers separately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kosini

How is "八つ" supposed to be pronounced? Duolingo says it's "はっつ" but jisho.org says it's "やっつ". Windows IME accepts both but is there a difference in meaning when pronouncing them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

It is pronounced as やっつ, never はっつ. I am hearing やっつ when I click the audio above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkaiKonekoChan

When the woman speaks it sounds like yattsu, but when the man speaks it sounds like yottsu. Maybe it's a regional dialect thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/user14572930

I wrote 「八つの椅子があります」 but it wasn't accepted. Is the sentence wrong or is it duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jombridge

Whyyyy do they need so many different words for the same numbers? I swear there's been at least three ways of saying 9 now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

I have seen more in English..

  • nine, ninth
  • November "ninth month," novenary "of nine," nonagon "shape with nine sides," noon "ninth hour"
  • ennead, enneadic, enneagon

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jombridge

We barely use some of nonagon or novenary (I've never even heard of that one), but we DO say "nine things, nine people, nine PM, nine (on its own), and even "ninth" is just nine with a "th" on the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

きゅう is the common reading. 9人, 9本, 9個, 9歳, etc. all read きゅう

ここのつ/ここのか are the only ones with kun'yomi to count 9 things and 9 days (or 9th day)

九月(くがつ), 九時(くじ) are the only common on'yomi exceptions from きゅう to say 9th month and 9th hour. There are some advanced ones not as common - e.g. 9条(くじょう), 九九(くく - the multiplication table)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bruno_gomes2012

what about amounts higher than nine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam_50

The same pattern continues.

"There are eighty-seven chairs"【椅子が八十七つあります】


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

There is no つ after any numbers greater than 9. In fact after 10, it is common to revert back to the on'yomi. Thus we tend to add back the quantifier, in this case 脚(きゃく).

ここのつ => 九つ
とお => 十
じゅういち => 十一
じゅうに => 十二
...

椅子が八十七あります or 椅子が八十七脚あります


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/floomo

This might be covered later but I have a question about the kanji usage here. So the accepted kanji for chair (いす) here is 椅子 which apparently means "chair" + "child" (among other things). So is this referring to a special kind of chair, or is there some other reason for this kanji combination?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

子 was originated from pictogram of a small child. The use of suffix like (Chinese) 椅子(chair),桌子(table),瓶子(bottle) is a derived use to indicate the object is small. Japanese 椅子 is imported from Chinese.

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