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  5. "She does not run a lot."

"She does not run a lot."

Translation:彼女はあまり走りません。

June 16, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rbenfield3

What is the difference in amari and takusan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaz808583

I think amari is for negative statements and takusan is positive statements.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/absmnt

That makes sense. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LMicaela

あまり (amari) is used when you're saying you dont do something often, or not that much (for example not reading often, or not sleeping that much). たくさん (takusan) is used when you're saying there is a lot of something (for example saying there are a lot of books, or there are a lot of people.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelise_627

So basically you're saying that あまり is like the word "hardly" and たくさん is like the term "a lot"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan632745

たくさん is more for quantities I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

Then, how would one say "I run a lot" in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

たくさん走ります、たくさん走る


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen386452

This was close to my guess that たくさん was used for nouns and あまりwas used for verbs, but I'm not sure how a sentence being negative or positive affects this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Monalisa--

彼女はあまり走りません (kanojyo ha amari hashiri masen)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Razukin

Why can't I leave out かのじょ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

If you leave kanojo out we're assuming that the speaker does not run alot. When in fact we're not talking about ourselves but someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMarkov

Duo wants you to talk specifically about a female third person, so you have to use it, but in context it wouldn't be mandatory


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plineder

Shouldn`t が (ga) substitute は (wa) here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PDBPH

You are talking about her, so she makes the subject, hence は。 Don't worry, particles get more complicated with time. I promise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donatelo950359

I think that because you are talking about "her" without using her name, you are assuming the person you speak to knows who "she" is, therefore, "she" (who ever she may be) is within context, and so not a new subject introduced into the conversation. Because of that you use は. If you referred to someone/something now previously mentioned during the conversation, then you would you が.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dollarous

走 looks like someone stretching their legs before a run. I needed that to remember the difference between 走(run) and 散歩(walk)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vianzlonom

We use double particle は isn't it suppose to be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PDBPH

走り = はしり = hashiri かのじょ は はしり Or in full kanji 彼女 は 走り Meaning the second は is part od of the word for "run".

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