"I am British."

Translation:イギリス人です。

June 16, 2017

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrGah

Can i put 'watashi'?

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paralars1

Yes. わたしはイギリス人です

You would say this if you're talking with other people about their nationalities, to make clear you're talking about yourself now.

If you're just introducing yourself, you could just say

イギリス人です

because it's clear from context that you mean yourself

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Contemno_I

Watashi is usually written like 私, am I right? Is it common to write it like わたし?

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlos.val755414

I think the kanji is more common since they're meant to shorten the hiragana when writing Japanese.

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crashedtime

Yes, 私 appears more often than the hiragana :)

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Purple1736678

Yes but watashi Can also be written like 渡 i think

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Da-Di-Dum

If you are talking about yourself you can always add "watashi" and then the appropriate particle to the beginning of the sentence, but if it is not necessary it will make you come across as robotic or stiff.

February 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fradann

Same question. Is putting Watashi really wrong?

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranciscoCG_

It isn't wrong but you have to write "wa" next to it. There wasn't a wa in the word boxes.

October 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KQin2

If you want to put わたし,you also need to put は backwards ,'cause は(wa) is an auxiliary word, But there is no は.

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex876227

What? I even more confused now

July 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaimeNyx

They really need to fix the 人 audio error. It doesn't trip me up too much when I'm in practice, but it's annoying, and downright bad for people seeing it for the first time and those who are coming back to Japanese after a while.

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferLa403535

Thank you, yes! After a while I started to think it was "hito" not 'jin."

May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmithVisha

What does 人 represen?

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_whitedeer_

It is the Kanji for "Jin" meaning person. "I am a British person"

December 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sian2306

So can you say it without 人 also?

May 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

You can, but "イギリスです" means "It's Britain" (though I have been told when I sing karaoke people feel transported) and "イギリスのです" could be "It's/I'm Britain's" or "of Britain" with only "イギリスからです" or "イギリス出身です" meaning "It's/I'm (originally) from Britain" being really applicable in this case unless maybe you're famous (but maybe that's old-fashioned?) or representing Britain (イギリス代表) or something . . .

May 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/x-yuri

though I have been told when I sing karaoke people feel transported

Feel transported? Feel like they're being transported to Britain? Feel like they're in Britain?

June 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Purple1736678

私はイギリス人です (I am British.) 私はイギリスの出身です (I am from the UK.) So That means I am British. When you see (Jin) it means to be (something). And when you see the other one it means To be from somewhere. I hope this helped. Keep learning!

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelRan25797

Why does the male speaker pronounce 人 as "Hito" and the female pronounces it as "Jin"?

April 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YNW17

The kanji to イギリス is 英国

November 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pavithra_Rajesh

Well, its not quite true.The Kanji reads Eigo which means English but igirisu is a word which is of foreign origin (which explains why it is written in Katakana) so there can only be a kanji to igirisu if a Japanese word with the same meaning existed.Fro example the kanji for Kekonshiki (marriage) can also be read as mareji- as in the english katakan version. Hope this helps ;P

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pavithra_Rajesh
  • PS it is Kekkonshiki.
February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

Actually the ateji (phonetic kanji for foreign words, in this case peculiar to Japanese as it was invented by the Japanese press, and usually used only till the war) for イギリス is 英吉利, and 英国 surely comes from that.

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertogat12

When selected sometimes 人 is pronounced 'jin' and other times 'hito'. Any insight as to why?

January 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GothiQhaQer

What does "jin" mean and when is it used?

January 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crashedtime

人 means "person" and can be used when describing a type of person (example: 白人 - white/Caucasian person) or their nationality. But it also comes up in words like "villager" (村人), "population" (人口), and others. 人also has multiple pronunciations (in different situations and kanji combinations).

Jisho.org has some good examples of the different ways it can be used, as well as the various ways to pronounce it: https://jisho.org/search/%23kanji%20%E4%BA%BA

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoryZ182

Tangorin.com is also a great resource for looking up words in Japanese. I use both tangorin and jisho regularly. (jisho means dictionary in Japanese).

August 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew897318

So far I have only seen it used at the end of a country's name, (e.g. America,) and it means person, so it would be American person, or American, so this sentence, "I am British," has jin at the end of Britain to signify you mean "I am British."

April 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahbabur

The kanji jin means people or person

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrmExr2487

イギリス sounds derived from "English", but they're using it here to mean the UK in general. What if you wanted to specify that you were Scottish, Welsh, or English, not "British"?

July 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I am English / Scottish / Welsh are, respectively:

イングランド人です

スコットランド人です

ウェールズ人です

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telemetry

北(きた)アイルランド人です for Northern Irish I guess?

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Yes. 北アイルランド人 = a Northern Irish person.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

イングランド人 English (person).

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

People often seem to use イギリス to mean England, and terms like 英国 to refer to either as well. It's all mixed up. If you want to be specific I'd try (グレートブリテンおよび北アイルランド/イギリス)連合王国 . . .

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pavithra_Rajesh

Actually Igirisu sound is derived from a Polish word Ingeles which means British..Just remember the fact that Polish people came to JP before the others and thus igirisu came to be used to mention the British..

hope this helps ;P

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachy90

Portuguese, not Polish, surely? In 1543? In which case it would be "Inglez".

April 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickolasRi4

What does 人 mean?

June 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RVJioWts

"Person"

In this specific example, it is read じん and it combines with the name of a country to form the demonym of the country (eg American, British, Chinese, Japanese, etc.). For example:

イギリス = Britain -> イギリス人 = British

アメリカ = America -> アメリカ人 = American

日本 = Japan -> 日本人 = Japanese

That same kanji has other readings and usages, as well. If it is by itself in a sentence and not combining with any other kanji, it is usually read ひと and means just the noun "person." If it is at the end of a number, it is read either り or にん and serves as the counter word for counting people (eg ひとり = 一人 = 1 person, さんにん = 三人 = 3 people, etc.)

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakusinn1

Can some explain why the the upside down V thing is there, what does it mean?

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

See the answer given by RVJioWts to NickolasRi4's question (above).

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LYL30

This means 'I am English', not 'I am British'. They are not the same thing.

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Well, no, it doesn't really mean "I am English". Despite its being true that:

1) people outside Britain are notoriously prone to failing to make the distinction between the UK, Great Britain, and England; and

2) the Japanese word イギリス (Igirisu) does derive, historically, from the Portuguese word for "English"

イギリス nevertheless refers to the whole of the UK -- so that an イギリス人 is someone from the UK, not just from England.

The Japanese word for England is イングランド (Igurando), which means that someone specifically from England is an イングランド人 (Igurandoji).

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachy90

On the other hand, "British" doesn't precisely mean "from the UK" either, but the distinction is a bit tricky.

April 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LMIjt

What's the difference between "egirisu jin desu" and "egirisu shyushindesu"? I apologize for my own transcription in romaji but I havent a keyboard for hiragana atm

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

イギリス人です -- igirisu jin desu -- means "I'm a British person".

イギリス出身です -- igirisu shusshin desu -- means "I'm from / a native of / was born in Britain".

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachy90

So if you moved to the UK and became a citizen, does that mean you would be イギリス人, but not イギリスしゅっしん?

April 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

Naturalized people in Japan become 日本人. 出身(しゅっしん)depends more on context, but probably. Some 日本人 are foreign-born and educated, so naturalization is only a distraction here.

April 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DDUNKnJAY

How would one pronounce this?

February 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli210639

Depending on the context could this mean something like they are british?

April 29, 2019

[deactivated user]

    the speaker pronounces the "jin" kanji as hito. Is it incorrect to pronounce it as "jin" in this case? I am confused because in other sentences with a similar topic the "jin" kanji is actually pronounced as "jin"

    May 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adriennnne

    I was rushing through this and pressed "submit" or whatever the button on the bottom is before i finished selecting words. It marked it as correct even thought it was missing the last two symbols (hiragana?). Why is it correct without the verb?

    May 31, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shademarc

    What if I'm with a group of friends, can I add "ore wa"?

    June 1, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerrySinef

    why is it that sometimes '人' is pronounced "jing" but other times it's pronounced "hitoh". It also seems like it's only the male narrator who pronounces it "hitoh"

    June 14, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/x-yuri

    Chinese writing system was borrowed by Japanese along with Chinese pronunciation (or its approximation). But they decided to link kanji to Japanese words as well. As a result, each kanji generally has Chinese (on'yomi), and Japanese (kun'yomi) pronunciations. E.g.

    Kun: ひと (hito)、 -り、 -と

    On: ジン (jin)、 ニン (nin)

    https://jisho.org/search/%E4%BA%BA%20%23kanji

    More on it here: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/onyomi-kunyomi/

    June 14, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerrySinef

    interesting, thanks

    June 14, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatBlancha2

    Why is the character for "jin" sometimes pronounced "jin" and sometimes pronounced "hito"?

    June 25, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/x-yuri

    See my other answers.

    June 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoryZ182

    Kanji characters are different from hiragana and katakana, since kanji doesn't have just one way to read/say it. Hiragana and katakana are phonetic, so each character has one pronunciation. A kanji character has a specific meaning, but the pronunciation changes depending on context.

    For example, 人 means person. It can be pronounced ひと, じん, or にん, or something else depending on context. In おんなの人 (female person), it is pronounced ひと. In イギリス人 (English/British person), it is pronounced じん. In 三人 (three people), it is pronounced にん. The characters 一人 (alone/one person), however, are pronounced ひとり, breaking the traditional pronunciation.

    Knowing how to pronounce the kanji just comes with practice and learning vocabulary. Eventually you will be able to form an educated guess at how it is pronounced, matching the kanji meanings with the vocab you know.

    August 26, 2019
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