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  5. "かのじょはみどりいろのぼうしがほしいです。"

"かのじょはみどりいろのぼうしがほしいです。"

Translation:She wants a green hat.

June 16, 2017

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaeRank

I think 'would like' should also be accepted. Not just 'wants.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paralars1

You only say that when you're actually asking someone for a hat, politely. That's not what this sentence means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BennyRenard

In English? The comment you are responding to should be correct. She would like a hat. She wants a hat. They are both epsilon-off from the same idea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

Same concept, but different tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CasperDisaster

Report it. I agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank231966

Can this also be: "The girl wants a green hat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris319610

But the real question is, does the girl have a name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Templar_Fe

The girl has no name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashflutter

She-who-must-not-be-named.... Voldemort is that you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

女の子 (onna no ko) is "girl"

彼女 (kanojo) is "she"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynGaia

Yes, it's correct too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeraYagami

Also confused why singular is not being accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikaFurudo

I think this question messed up for me with the answers. It just put the entire solution for me in one bracket to choose after "かの" and "じ".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nalsai

I had the same bug


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drumada

Same here. Its kinda hilarious though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_wei

彼女は緑色の帽子が欲しいです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zeltefka

Shouldn't it be ほしがっています and not ほしいです, because we are talking about somebody else's desires?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

Agreed, I've been taught the same at uni.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex425703

I think ほしがっています is continuative and ほしいです is meant to emphasize that she wants the hat now. Although I'm not sure, someone please verify it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You usually use ほしい (hoshii) to talk about what you yourself want. It's a strong word, so in Japanese it's more polite to use ほしがっています (hoshigatteimasu) to talk about what other people want.

Puni Puni Japan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/folionoire1

Why is the hat a cap now? Are these not different concepts with different words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerryWallwork

It can be both though I do think the English sentences should be uniform in which they use, unless cap and hat can be accepted as correct answers:

帽子 [ぼうし]: (P, n) hat, cap


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

In English, cap is specifically a head covering with no brim (and with or without a peak) that is relatively close fitting to the head. The Japanese word ぼし may not carry such a distinction and could refer to all kinds of headwear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefanos714672

Why is "She wants THE green hat" not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlGonzal1

That's why midoriya's costume is green


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Gaargh, why did they have to introduce ぼうし and ほしい at the same time??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thunderrabbit

So we learn the importance of those two little marks. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

And elongated vowel sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Angel28

What is の exactly doing here? Please, help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You can use の to modify a noun with another noun. 緑色 (midori iro, green) is a noun, so to describe the hat you need the particle の.

緑色の帽子

midori iro no boushi

hat of green (green hat)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juan890458

Hi! Can anyone tell me why it is が and not を? Isn't the hat the object while "she" is the subject?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Want" is a verb, so you're right that "hat" is the object of the sentence in English. But in Japanese, ほしい (hoshii) is an adjective describing the hat. What this sentence is literally saying is "a green hat is wanted by her".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyperguyver

pretty sure you do not normally use いろ with 緑


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo240

Actually you should, or you can say for example 緑のぼうし


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You wouldn't think so, but I hear it. I also often hear Japanese people saying things like "green color" in English instead of "green" because they're translating from 緑色 in their heads.

Some quick examples from google:

緑色のイメージ

緑色のツム

緑色のウンチ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellieplants

i think another way of saying it would be "She wants to buy the hat" using the たい verb ending but that's just me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

彼女は帽子が欲しいです。

Kanojo wa boushi ga hoshii desu.

She wants a hat.

彼女は帽子が買いたいです。

Kanojo wa boushi ga kaitai desu.

She wants to buy the hat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddkenjiro

Apparently I heard that you cannot use ほしい to speak about the wants of others. That is has to be expressed more indirectly using the verb がる。So the sentence may in fact should look like:  かのじょはみどりいろのぼうしがほしがっています。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rasp589734

why sometimes there is a no after a color and sometimes a i?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Some colors in Japanese have both a noun and adjective form. Some colors only have a noun form. When you use a noun to describe another noun, you need to use の.

緑色の帽子 (midori iro no boushi) - green hat

赤色の帽子 (aka iro no boushi) - red hat

Many adjectives in Japanese end in -i. When you use an adjective to describe another word, you don't need to add anything. Red has both a noun form and and adjective form, so you can also say red hat this way:

赤い帽子 (akai boushi) - red hat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sky570973

Why it's 緑色 (midori iro) and not みどり(midori) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Were you typing your own answer, and if so what was your full answer? What kind of question was it? You can say 緑色のぼうし (midori iro no boushi) or みどりのぼうし (midori no boushi), and both should be marked correct as long as the rest of the answer was correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bexon

When translated into Chinese, this sentence can mean she want's her partner to have an affair with someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashflutter

Again, why is "desu" at the end??

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