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  5. "母にうでどけいをあげます。"

"母にうでどけいをあげます。"

Translation:I will give a watch to my mother.

June 17, 2017

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

母に腕時計をあげます


[deactivated user]

    With Kanji it's 上げます :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martin.mk

    Actually, rarely.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rayworld8

    You actually have to be careful. If I remember correctly, あげる translates to "give", while 上げる translates to "raise, improve".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElGringo207186

    Lol i wrote: I gave my watch to a mother. What was I thinking? But would it be also right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catlinbelle

    Almost did the same! It is pretty similar but it wouldn't be right. The sentence uses "haha" which means "my mother" and is only used for your own mom. To say someone else's mom I believe it is "okaasan" (which you can also use for your own mom).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Limeila

    "I gave" would be "agemashita" though (past tense)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael506383

    I don't have a horse in this race but I would like to argue that in English, if you say "I gave mother [...]" it is always implied that you are speaking of your own mother.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    You are correct, though "Mother" should be capitalized when used as a proper noun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleClemen5

    "I give mother a watch" was rejected.


    [deactivated user]

      Japanese does differentiate between ones own mother (はは) and other mothers (おかあさん).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbinero

      That sentence did talk about one's own mother, otherwise it would be "I give your mother a watch."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura209845

      You also don't refer to other people's mothers as Mom, yet the owl rejects Mom as a translation. Dad works for 父 in other exercise sentences, so there is no logic to what is accepted.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

      Depends on what you typed for the rest of the sentence, but that seems fine.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Limeila

      mom was accepted for me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jnantes

      whats the difference between udedokei and tokei?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paralars1

      とけい is any watch or clock

      うで means arm

      うでどけい is a wristwatch

      says the dictionary


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meandmywifi

      I wrote wrist watch and it marked me wrong..


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuioVal

      Flag it! Even if it's uncommon it's still correct


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian365129

      "wristwatch" is usually one word, and it's not commonly used these days.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

      Wrist watch was the original term...not sure when it became common to make it one. Less then 100 years though.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara_han

      "I give my mother a wash" - thanks autocorrect!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kagabati

      Why isn't the verb あげります? I thought that when you put a verb into -ます form, you change the u component to it's i version, like with もらう/もらいます. What am I not picking up on?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrlazyface

      It is a group II verb, because it ends with 〜える, and so conjugates differently. Verbs ending in 〜いる do this too.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebAzevedo

      Taking it a bit further:

      -eru and -iru ending verbs you remove る to add -ます. Ex: 食べる (たべる) becomes 食べます (たべます).

      -u ending verbs (including the other -ru endings) you change i to u before adding -ます. Ex: 上る (のぼる notice the -oru ending) becomes 上ります (のぼります).

      And then there are the iregulars -uru endings する and くる, where you remove the whole -uru to します and きます and yeah, good luck.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

      They're only somewhat irregular. You're still changing the -u syllable to an -i syllable and adding ます.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

      Also known (I think more commonly) as ichidan (一段). Godan (五段) verbs are the ones you were thinking of when you used もらう as an example.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelheid_G

      'wristwatch' marked incorrect


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1chope

      "I offer a watch to my mother" was not accepted. Native English speakers, is there any problem with that sentence? Or just lack of available options?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

      "offer" means something different from "give".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

      "Offer" implies you are giving a gift or something special, or you are trying to make a deal with someone. It heavily implies that the recipient is being given a choice of whether or not to accept the item. "Give" is much more simple, and tends to describe the action itself without regard to the circumstances surrounding the action.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerdbonez

      What would 'my mother gave me a watch' look like?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

      母がうでどけいをあげました


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian_Jean

      How would I say "my mother will give me a watch"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

      母がうでどけいをあげます。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heiposan

      Shouldn't there be an お before 母?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

      お母さん (what you’re thinking of) is used when talking about someone else’s mom.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthia917460

      "I will give my mother a watch" was marked wrong. I wonder why.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roland827522

      If it also translates to offer, why mark the sentence wrong when not using give ?

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