https://www.duolingo.com/ghibulo

Learning two languages mutually?

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German and english are both foreign languages for me and so I decided to subscribe "english -> german and "german -> english". It's a bit uncomfortable to switch every day through "add a new course" -> "english for german speakers" ...but it seems to be useful for my learning both languages. Is it a common practice on Duolingo or my way is strange? If it's a commen practice, it would be better to have an opinion of checking more "mother languages".

6/17/2017, 2:07:44 PM

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ghibulo
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Thx for your answers. I have a good level of reading English in my opinion but understand the spoken words is poor. My german is much worse - an advanced beginner :-) But for the duo german->english course I can still make the right answers to the second or third attempt quite easily and there is no problem to understand the meaning. Btw duolingo isn't best for starting a new language from scratch in my opinion - I have a bad experience with Spanish, a beginner needs much more explanations in my opinion.

6/17/2017, 7:28:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KuriousBean

As to starting a new language from scratch with Duolingo, I think it depends. I've had a lot of success learning German from scratch with nothing but Duolingo, but that was definitely not possible when I was beginning to learn Turkish.

6/24/2017, 9:25:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/KristenDQ
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I would say it's fairly common as when most people are finished their original tree, they decide to do the reverse tree....learning their native language from their target language. I was there was an easier way to switch between reverse trees and the other trees but the only way to do that is through a script which Duolingo generally discourages.

6/17/2017, 2:12:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonkobu
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I think that depends. Are you learning English and German, or do you just know English and are trying to add German?

Trying to learn both languages is, I think, not the best way in general, since you might miss the meaning in both languages at once, but on Doulingo the sentences are quite simple so that should not be a problem.

If you are fluent in English and just do both courses to learn German, that is definitively the way to go. I have not started my reverse Spanish tree because I rather wanted to learn other languages as well, but for improving German, doing the reverse tree is definitely what you should do.

As for the course selection tool: I agree, you should just have the option to set the language of the app independently from the course, and than have a list of all possible courses (of at least the ones you have selected). With the current system I have definitively lost track of a lot of courses I am taking or have activated (many combinations of German, Spanish, French and English).

6/17/2017, 6:41:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/HorazioVilches

Doing "reverse trees" is very common, my main tree is german from english but I am also doing other reverse trees , total of 5 trees.

6/17/2017, 6:44:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/temacube
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I've completed a couple trees and have started using those as the "native" language to work on new languages. I think it's a great way to go. More fun than review or the reverse tree. I think ppl call it "laddering". I'd say you're on the right track. Don't be afraid to use google translate to check mutual translations you don't quite understand.

6/17/2017, 11:48:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/bababingo
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I think this has been called "laddering". I'm learning french From German and German from Italian. In French from GermanThere is More interesting vocabulary.than In German from English, for example, I don't recall learning "nude" "death" or "refound" but in the French from German course these are taught. More nuanced approach to articles and common structures that English doesn't often employ. I actually haven't done much with English from Deutsch, but the English parts were boring me.

6/19/2017, 5:48:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Spooky_Noodle
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English is my native language, so I can't answer that part of your question, but I can hopefully try to partially answer it? I've been using English > German for a while and have recently started German > English to get an extra boost in my learning. I've heard of many people learning this way, though I don't think I've heard of anyone using two languages that are not their first to learn both.

6/23/2017, 3:37:30 AM
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