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  5. "本をかすのがわたしのしごとです。"

"本をかすのがわたしのしごとです。"

Translation:My job is to lend books.

June 18, 2017

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

What is a librarian, Alex?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tng655656

Toshokanin. Right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Q1KS

That's useful to know; however, they were actually making an in-joke about an American TV game show called "Wheel Of Fortune" with that comment, not actually asking. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

本を貸すのが私の仕事です


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philallthethings

図書館司書です!としょかんししょ I never knew the word for this before :) the literal meaning of 司書 is something like administer of books, but the meaning changed in Mandarin to secretary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanshin

Haha, you seem so happy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woo877240

"My work is to lend books" should be an acceptable answer... the system insists on 'job' instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derek003

Similarly, Duo rejects "It's my business to lend books". Would "business" be a bad interpretation of しごと?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blessing-4dan

"shigoto" sounds like "shimoto" in this sentence and that threw me off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanjaR8

When "g" appears in the middle of a word, it's usually pronounced as a soft "ng". I was so confused until I learned that! ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MKanai

I listened to this 5 times and it sounds like shimoto everytime to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamOng

As you can read in the Wikipedia article on 'Japanese phonology' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_phonology), a G in the middle of an utterance is pronounced by some speakers as [ŋ] rather than [g] (The symbols are from the International Phonetic Alphabet.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

I should probably understand the difference by this point...but why is ga used here rather than wa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insanity54

Because the speaker is introducing the subject that they lend books, 【が】 is used. Had that fact been a known topic for both participants in the conversation, 【は】would have been more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamOng

The Pocket Kenkyusha Japanese Dictionary gives the rule of thumb that the first time something is mentioned in conversation, it is marked with , and subsequently with . Of course, as it also states, emphasizes the subject, while emphasizes the predicate. As others have said, you can think of as meaning 'as for'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denis021299

ぼしをうるのが私の犬のしごとです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MouliZoR

あなたの犬は天才ですね~!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tng655656

Toshokanin = librarian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sa967St

Yup. としょかんいん(図書館員).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

That would be romanized toshokan'in. toshokanin would be としょかにん. The apostrophe distinguishes んい from に


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11100100

本を貸すのが私の仕事です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RailGuit

A talking library, I see


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

I don't understand the のが, could someone help me out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

The の (no) makes the verb into a noun, so かす (kasu) usually means "to lend", but かすの (kasu no) means "lending". The が (ga) is just the usual subject marker particle.

"My job is lending books.*


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VvonD

Does the 'no' form followed by ga/wa make this more like "lending"? Just trying to work out what the function is here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Yes, that's exactly right. It makes the verb into a noun, and "lending" would be a more precise translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KnossosDomovoi

Can it also mean "I lend books at work"? If not, how would you say that in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

仕事で本を貸します。

Shigoto de hon o kashimasu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdonisCham1

Ongaku o kiku no ga watashi no shigoto da. Nante ne.

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