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  5. "今日はかのじょとあそびます。"

"今日はかのじょとあそびます。"

Translation:I will play with her today.

June 18, 2017

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ranggawiratno

If you know what I mean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheYinChen

This sentence might was made by Japanese who dosen't really know the meaning...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

English children don't play together?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

They only play in Alabama i f y o u k n o w w h a t i m e a n


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasONN

That's... messed up. Lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

Funny how people did not realize that the speaker could be a child


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dragon676225

.....or did they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Takkun11

Okay... i'm not gonna scroll through this comment section any further.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bohioo

I came for that kind of commentary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlphaAquilae

Yup, I pressed the discuss button because I was expecting this, wasn't disappointed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leila139610

あそぶ means to play or to hang out with... not just used when discussing children playing. For example you can say あそびましょう!And that would mean, Let's hang out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1chope

Yup! I remember the first time a Japanese friend (a woman) invited me to hang out at her place with some friends, at first I was like "wtf play together at my house? Is she implying something?" xD

Lukily there was someone around to ask about it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

I would've been so disappointed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1chope

Well; even if we didn't play we still had a lot of fun hanging out :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LM0Uxa

Im seeing other phrases as well where "visit" or "hang out" feels like better translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Il-Mentore

I suspect the Japanese simply never bothered to force a change in word usage between childhood and adulthood for the concept of hanging out. Essentially, "playing" as children is the same as "hanging out" as adults.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

今日は彼女と遊びます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

You are my Kanji hero


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

Pretty everyone doing Japanese on doing loves this guy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/firerosearien

you are filling my do-every-language-on-duolingo dream.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanStrokir

Kanojo can also mean Girlfriend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelda252

Pretty sure kanojo is more often used for 'girlfriend' than 'she' given how much the japanese hate their own pronouns


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haro904

So I'm not the only one that thought this sounded wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karma-san

The setence is completely fine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charade_s

What would this phrase be without the pronoun? Or would it usually just use her name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/willyie

今日は彼女と遊びます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camelrot

Would "I'm playing with her today" be incorrect? I know we use the progressive to denote the future sometimes, but Duo marked it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haro904

It should be right -ます is used for both present and future.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanjaR8

The continuous verb form ("-ing") is conjugated differently in Japanese. The ます form means simple present tense (e.g. "I play") or future tense (e.g. "I will play").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guayolove

Then the sentence should be accepted without "will" if you plan to do it, then tsumori or hazu should be added isn't?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shurekkk

There would be something like: 今日はかのじょとあそんでいます, て form + います is like "ing" in Jap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osh623126

If they accept 'I'm going' for 'I will go' then it's fundamentally irresponsible to mark you incorrect for that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

The english translation here would depend heavily on the context. I would tend to use "hang out"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joman.cini

Does it also mean like "playing" with her feelings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

No, that usage of the verb "play" in English does not translate into Japanese as あそぶ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

I guess duolingo creators have no idea that asobu is actually used as "to hang out with" much more often than "to play with" among adults...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

Agreed, and there are no good options for reporting an unnatural translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEGEND

Hopefully the date went well!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HessuHopo

"Today I hang out with my girlfriend" Is accepted and in my opinion the most accurate interpretation. "Today I play with her" Is weird to me because if you are familiar with your playmate why use a pronoun? And also in english playing is most often used (in the meaning of 遊ぶ) when playing with preteens or younger. I'm no Japanese guru. English is my second language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

Playing in this term is going out or hanging out together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CommodoreHarry

Asobi means either play or visit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlyssonOli973564

Should "Today I will play with her" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChikaraGuy

why does duolingo not show kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jas708136

This sentence could also be translated in the third person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Takkun11

今日は彼女と遊びます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/macrobius

At least somebody's getting some action.

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