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https://www.duolingo.com/Zig_Zag_Wanderer

A good idea to learn a third language taught using your second?

So I am learning Italian. Next I intend to learn French. I learnt it years ago, but not well, and I really want to learn it properly.

It's it a good idea to start my French course with an Italian 'base', ie as if it was my first (native) language?

If you have tried this, please let me know if it's a good idea, and if there is anything to be aware of. My only worry at present is that I may get confused between the two languages as they are similar.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Michael44.60
Michael44.60
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My native language is Hebrew, and I have learned German from English. It really wasn't hard in any kind of way, but maybe just because it's English and almost everyone knows this language in a pretty good level. Actually, in my opinion, learning German from English is much easier than learning it from Hebrew because they are 2 Germanic languages, and the similarity between them is very high, rather than Hebrew which is a lot different from these languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimX29
SimX29
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Yes, it is a good idea. If you are advanced in Italian, you should use it to learn French. (That's what I might do later on, but vice versa). Using English to learn Italian and French is fine, but you might get confused more, since these two languages are similar. Doing the French course from Italian will help you not only see the differences, but the similarities, too. I say go for it! Use your second language to learn your third, especially if they have words in common.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlivern

It's a excellent idea! I'm a native french-speaker, but I'm learning German from English. It makes my English stronger to use it while learning German. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamijaH.
SamijaH.
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I think you should do it. I also learned german (my third language) from english ( my second one). Right now I also started italian and if I had the opportunity on Duolingo, I would have learned it from german. But unfortunatelly they do not offer that so I will learn it from English. :/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnicholson
jimnicholson
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You will find people referring to this as Laddering.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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It all depends on how far along you are with Italian. If you are far enough along with Italian it will probably improve both languages. If your French is not strong enough, you will probably be confused. Why not try it, just to see how it goes? If it doesn't work now for you, figure you can try again some other time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super-Svensk
Super-Svensk
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I do something similar. I don't really have the time to practice all of my languages separately, so to save time (and to get more difficult practice), I have been learning French from German and Italian from Portuguese. Although I have completed all of these trees from English, I am still learning new vocabulary and reaching a higher level of fluency. It also helps me to stop thinking in English when I am practicing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zig_Zag_Wanderer

Thanks to everyone for your replies and encouragement. I will definitely try it in a few months.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crubioa
crubioa
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No, I think it is a bad idea unless you know your second language as well as your native one. You would miss all the nuances and would do more harm than good.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Always good to have a dissenting opinion I suppose, but there is a lot of space between "missing all the nuances" and native. I would think "fluent" would still be too high a bar to impose, but having native-level fluency in only one language yet having done all of my work on three languages here (including finishing the three trees and reaching level 25 in one) from 2nd languages with only the slightest difficulties, I feel I have sufficient grounds to say that "native" isn't the right standard.

1 year ago