"Name"

Translation:名前

June 18, 2017

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

Is it coincidential how close this sounds to the word "name"? I don't think Japanese would use a loanword for a word as basic as "name", and the fact that it's written in kanji makes me think even more that it's a coincidence. Either way, I'm thankful that Japanese has at least one cognate lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Would you think the sounds close, too? When I was a junior high school student, English teacher (Japanese) said 'you are lucky! at least you can memorize this word 'name' . '(^∇^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csvicc_

That's exaclty how I felt when I learned this word LOL. PS: the kanji for namae is so cute imo •-•


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JKjuice

How is kanji cute


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NotSoNormalWeeb

Kanji is a complicated kind of cute. A cute that you cannot quite define.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ga20X6bB

exactly! its like calling a little soup spoon cute and people looking at you funny. (its happened to me)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelipeKail.an

The words are really similar, but it is a coincidence. If it was an american adaptation, should be written in katakana. You can consider Kanji hiragana when translating, because evert kanji can be written in hiragana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keshavchak1

Coincidentally, name is "naam" in Hindi as well. Also the case in Sanskrit IIRC.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarrelOfBacon

I wouldn't say it's entirely coincidental in this case, given that Hindi is a part of Indo-European language family that includes English, among many others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenn167896

Japan had a lot of portugese contact in the 1500s and name is dervived from latin...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lennoard

Portuguese for name is 'nome'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devinvm

Isn't 名前 technically "first name" and 名 "name"?

(I understand that in an English context we usually refer to first name as name... but still, my brain likes understanding both natural usage and technical meaning.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joycourier

名前is full name, sometimes first name depending on context. 名 is more abstract, artistic, closer to "the concept of a name". Source: spent half an hour obsessing over this haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emanuel-Valerio

And what onamae means then, name either?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joycourier

The お at the front of 名前implies respect. Using お as a prefix is usually just being polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pi62e

I thought it was "Kimi no na wa" in the title?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra926428

I have heard people in anime say the word name but instead of 名前 they use 名. Also the movie "your name", the Japanese title is "kimi no na wa". So how many ways there are to say the word name? Is 名前 formal and simple 名 informal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gracia844237

Same, I'm so curious before why they use 名 instead of 名前 in the movie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agrippae

I thought 名 alone will also mean name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avaschmys

Is each one of these symbols a kanji or is the whole thing the kanji?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderS268748

Each symbol is kanji, the whole thing is a word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuuutsu777

The first one "名" means "name" and the other "前" was "before" i think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamCunnin6

Cognates are awesome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADJD4

Cognates are words that have a common etymological origin, so technically these (name and 名前) aren't cognates because Japanese and English are 'completely unrelated' languages, unlike English and Scots/Frisian/Dutch/German/Luxembourgish/Bavarian/Swedish/Danish/Norwegian/Icelandic/Yiddish/Interlingua/Latin/Norman/French/Haitian/Catalan/Spanish/Portuguese/Romanian/Esperanto/Ido/Kurdish/Persian/Mazanderani/Sindhi/Hindi/Urdu/Bengali, which are related and in which the words for 'name' are indeed cognates (that was fun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADJD4

How did I miss Greek? The Greek όνομα is of course also a cognate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejjhbennett

Are there any differences between 'onamae' and 'namae'? Except for the 'o' of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phantombz

the 'o' is just there for politeness, its ok to omit it

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