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  5. "かさをさしてください。"

"かさをさしてください。"

Translation:Please put up an umbrella.

June 18, 2017

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bucky868332

"Please open the umbrella."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candy580365

Just like the other question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

It's accepted now. Additionally, while "put up" is not a particularly normal thing to say in English when referring to an umbrella, I think it gives a closer approximation of the Japanese: https://jisho.org/search/%E5%B7%AE%E3%81%99

差す: "(6) To hold up (an umbrella, etc.); to put up; to raise"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

傘を差して下さい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Note however that 下さい/ください is usually written in kana only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee418447

Please use an umbrella


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James151779

I tried that one, but it counted it wrong. I guess they consider an umbrella to have lots of different uses. <G>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qimerra

Yeah, in a real life context this would be MUCH more likely to be the intended meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

This is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kazeshinimeyo

The answer it wanted does not make any sense in English. Put up an Umbrella? As a Native English speaker, I can say I have never heard that in my life. If it is about opening the umbrella to use it- we do not say "put up" because "put up" means "put away". If it is about putting away the umbrella, it has to be "the" umbrella. Anything else just doesn't make any sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlejandraA142609

I agree, it would be the same if you want to translate this sentence into Spanish. So I wrote, Please use the umbrella, and I got it right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stevrn4

"Please put an umbrella up"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaseSmith5

This felt so wrong to write in English.... I'd rather be rained on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horizon241

Since it is sunny and we are at the beach, please put up an umbrella.

晴れてビーチにいるので、傘をしてください。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konim96

In English, wouldn't that be a parasol? I've always thought that an umbrella is protection against rain, while a parasol against the sun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

Wow. Just checked a couple dictionaries & that seems to be 100% the case. Never knew this; always thought they were interchangeable. Although, I guess it is splitting hairs a bit as they're normally functionally equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel514935

Please put away the umbrella. It wanted Please put up the umbrella. Us there really that much of a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisamatule

I've heard 'please put up' as 'please put away', but I think this is intending 'please open the umbrella'. It's not very clear phrasing duo is using...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clickonwhatnow

Regardless, where more than one phrasing could be used, more than one answer should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dot844345

Easy cheat=Duolingo uses the same word for Bloom(in reference to a flower opening) that they use for opening an umbrella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdelkader13052

no, the verb isn't the same, here it is 差す but to bloom is 咲く


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mom0Suke

I agree with lisamatule, 'to put up' technically means 'to open', but to open an umbrella is way more common. At least where I'm from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeHorvath4

Well it makes sense if you use it in the context of a beach umbrella specifically. Because you would have to put up an umbrella in the sand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asaph.neig

In what other instances is "差す" used other than umbrellas?

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