Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Two different review strategies for day to day reviews?

It would seem that I've been using two different review strategies which would appear to work under different circumstances. I generally review skill areas where the gold color has gone back to the original color and where the strength has been reduced from 5/5, though if all is gold on a given day I review random areas or use the home page "Strengthen Skills" link.

Which of the two approaches I use depends on how well I know the material. Suppose it is an area I know well like "Animals". I then use the "Strengthen" link at the top of the page which allows for a more complex and comprehensive review. However this can be confusing, particularly in areas like "Verbs: Past 2". So for any area where I'm confused I will repeat the individual lessons one at a time until I know them and can start using the area Strengthen link.

Re-doing lessons allows for smaller bites and more intense review of fewer words. Strengthen exercise allows for more complex questions, more ambiguous presentation so that deeper understanding can develop.

As I've mentioned before I am a rote learner, starting from zero, with no previous knowledge of Irish spelling, grammar nor vocabulary. But there must be other strategies evolved by other learners. So, as I develop more understanding of the language I'd be interested in reading about other people's insights about their own strategies.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rjcrjc7313

something that has been helping me a lot lately is going for walks and reciting vocab. Sounds a bit mad but I will basically talk to myself by saying what I see or hear on my walk in Irish. So for example if I'm walking in the woods where there is a river I might say "Táim sna coillte agus feicim lacha san abhainn". I will keep trying to add more complex vocab on each walk. This repetitive system helps me remember vocab and it's good for pronunciation as I'm getting used to having the language on my tongue. Also I find it quite fun.

Later on I plan to keep a diary in Irish as well

For Doulingo it self I try to do a lesson and strengthen a skill a day

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

I do some reciting of vocabulary, but I concentrate on words I've hear recently spoken by an Irish speaker. If I try to read words and pronounce them my really bad American accent comes through.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjcrjc7313

that's where the magic of the internet comes in handy. I can just check the pronunciation on Focloir whenever I want to learn a new word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

You're right about the use of the pronunciation dictionary for words. Do you have any advice for sentences? Since my worst Englishisms seem to come from wrong word emphasis and word separation problems since good Irish runs together differently.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjcrjc7313

it would be helpful to listen to Irish speakers on Tg4 or the radio so you get a feel for the language. Since I am Irish (was awful at it when I was young, only started learning it properly now)and find it fairly natural to speak it's kinda hard to give general advice apart from the basics like vowels and stuff. If you keep learning the language, speaking it and checking your pronunciation I"m sure it will turn out fine.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel554596

I've only just started a week ago so it's early days, but I am taking the same approach as you, and just keep going back where I see that a strength has weakened. I tend to do the basic lesson first and follow that with the strengthening practice so I am getting the most out of it.

I'm supplementing this learning with listening to CDs from two other courses whenever I am in my car. While they are not teaching the same vocabulary at the same time as Duolingo, it's helping me to get used to hearing the language and picking up new words - but particularly in practicing my pronunciation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

For anyone else interested in listening to some Irish as you drive, the Irish Independent newspaper created two CDs with Liam Ó Maonlaí in 2007, "Learn Irish" and "Everyday Irish" with useful phrases in Irish and English. The MP3 files are still available online from the Irish Independent website:
http://www.independent.ie/life/family/learning/learn-irish-with-liam-o-maonlai-26460087.html

The CDs were created for an Irish audience, who would have covered the basics in school, so there's no explanation of any grammatical issues, (a bit like doing Duolingo for people who don't read the discussions!), just an opportunity to hear various phrases translated and a chance to hear more audio in Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mothermett

Do you know what dialect this is?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It's pretty much standard Irish, with some Connacht influences.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

As the sentences became longer and the spelling more difficult in the latter half of the course I've added a third review strategy.

Since I've run through the tree and am only doing daily reviews I always open a throw away text file, 'untitled.txt'. Then, no matter which kind of lesson I'm reviewing I will type both English and Irish sentences on my text file, paying particular attention to spelling. Over time I am learning to spell the Irish without looking, which of course means that I'm gradually learning it.

After a year, I'm starting to understand the RTE radio a little bit and the same technique of transcription, like typing dictation, appears to be working for this as well. This takes an effort at using the dictionary to look up spelling.

(This is http://www.rte.ie/radio/ for those who don't know the link.)

7 months ago