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  5. "やさいは好きじゃないです。"

"やさいは好きじゃないです。"

Translation:I do not like vegetables.

June 18, 2017

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamScott794079

Come on. Here comes the aeroplane.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D1ExH4RD

In approximately 20 years at the pace of your learning you can run the new world order by speaking the language of every people you visit easily. No pressure. We need you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archrodney

The levels on Duolingo can be misleading...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrackedLCD

Duo must cater to picky eaters. First it was "I don't like meat," then "I don't like water (!)" Now it's "I don't like vegetables."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

何も好きじゃない。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krisco.land

"What else dont you like?" Right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

"I don't like anything."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wayne.beck

Hmm. So why does it have 何?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNewSoundtrack

it's not really 何 by itself, it's 何も which means "nothing".


[deactivated user]

    is this grouchy Smurf?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DashAlex22

    グラウチー:「全てが嫌いですよ!」


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoroushSab2

    I actually thought it was this too, haha.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshayDwivedi

    I maybe be wrong but shouldn't it be "nani mo suki jyanai desu ka?". Right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManoahKun

    How is duo even alive?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyCardoso23

    It eats the souls from people who party 24 hours


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucasv50ae

    who doesnt like water ? do they preffer to die of dehydration then?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas736242

    My friend doesn't like water


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btbl

    I came to read the judging


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexRodrgu375171

    I didn't think you needed to place "desu" after "jyanai".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanda976411

    Adding です after a casual negative (such as じゃない) makes the sentance sound more polite.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

    yeah if you're talking to a friend you don't need desu but if you're talking to a stranger or superior you would put desu.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurros

    Ahh ok so this is because "suki" isn't actually a verb? It is an adjective? So a more literal translation is "vegeatable not good it is"? In other words one is saying vegeatables have the property that you don't like them, rather than stating that you don't like them as an action/verb?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanda976411

    It would more like "Vegetables likable is not" if you were to translate it literally. Your on the right track, it is an adjective. Iteans likable.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynaDuante

    なぜ? やさい が 好き です!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuu-tama

    やさいがとてもまずいですから。。。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanese_Neko

    野菜はおいしいです!!野菜を食べよう!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanicaBescae

    私も野菜が好きです!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ichigotchi

    野菜は美味しいよね!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romcheek

    Shouldn't it be ga not ha?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paralars1

    both work. with はit's a more general statement: Vegetables: don't like. With が it's like you're identifying vegetables as the thing you don't like. Vegetables is the thing, which I don't like. For example when you're asked to rate a dish.

    Pretty interchangeable in this context, but I feel like は is used more commonly in that situation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonclay

    Basically what paralars said. Ga would imply you don't like the vegetables you are eating in front of you, though you may like other vegetables of the same kind if they were prepared better. Wa implies that you don't like vegetables in general


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megahbite

    To add on to what the others have said, you would mainly use は in this sentence as a response to a question. Like if someone said "romcheekさん、やさいが好きですか?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ephoralolol

    -doesn't like water. -doesn't like meat. -doesn't like vegetables. Who the hell are you ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awelottta

    They eat powdered soylent


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/punkdoabc

    It is such a common thing for children to say, and it just got me wondering... Why do toddlers fear vegetables??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oyasumi-Sinna

    'Cause they taste super yucky!!!

    ... I agree with toddlers on many things.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flish32

    I guess it comes down to biology. Vegetables, while useful for long term health, aren't exactly the most necessary thing when developing. Things that are higher in calories would be more useful to the body because that gives it more than enough to fuel it's growth. After the body's matured better, I guess the brain would be able to teach itself to like vegetables. I don't know, just speculation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNewSoundtrack

    Can you use 好きじゃない for something that isn't food?

    Like かれは好きじゃないです (I don't like him).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    Yep! As a matter of fact I believe 大好きです (I like you a lot) is a common way to say "I love you".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNewSoundtrack

    Nice! ありがとう!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/french_cartoon

    Can somebody help me, is 好きではありません not correct? I learned it that way before and wondering if I should unlearn it now.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryszard466485

    好きではありません is more formal/polite than 好きじゃないです. 好きじゃないです is more formal/polite than 好きじゃない.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanda976411

    To all the people asking about this: ない is the casual form, ありません is the ます form. Both ありません and ないです are acceptable as polite negatives because てす is polite on the end of most sentences. So, don't unlearn, just learn both!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZelieZazou

    野菜は好きじゃないです。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riepah

    I absolutely agree with this statement. However, the one that said "I do not like meat" should be changed. Do not teach heresy, duolingo!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanese_Neko

    EAT YOUR VEGETABLES!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_angryjelly_

    Isn't "yasai wa suki dewanai" possible?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris.Guillen

    This makes me laugh because the order of the sentence works out where you can say "Vegetables ! (This is what we're talking about) I like... NOT.. it is)" It's like saying, "Yeah, I like vegetables !... not!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shedopen

    Can I also say: やさいは好きません ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNewSoundtrack

    I don't think so, the correct formal way is "好きではありません".

    やさいは好きではありません in your example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howabunga

    野菜は好きじゃないです


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hayley40764

    said every child ever


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjaugusta

    if "nai" is the negation, what does "ja" mean before it? Why is it there?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archrodney

    Okay, so I asked a Japanese friend and he told me that じゃない (janai) and じゃありません (jaarimasen) are sets, you always use these to express the negative form. And "ja" doesn't have any specific meaning in either of them. Hope this answers your question.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shakushain

    No V E G E T A L S


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captainamberg

    “野菜は好きじゃないです” The kanji for やさい should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XPK15

    野菜は好きじゃないです。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoyDylon

    please can someone answer this. why not を instead of は. are the vegetables not the direct object??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DashAlex22

    好き is a na-adjective used to say that we like or may not like something. Therefore, you would use は or が instead of を to say you like something. For example, 野菜が好きです (Yasai ga suki desu) which means "I like vegetables" could be translated literally as "The vegetables are likeable".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNameIsNiu

    And I don't like sand


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanese_Neko

    I would say "野菜が嫌いです。" instead (even though I love veggies)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaDac

    I wrote "野菜は好きじゃないです" and it was marked wrong, I don't know why. Usually it picks up the kanjis and marks them as correct, doesn't it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lovisa921086

    Shouldn't it be "やさいは好きじゃありません。" as ない is the short form of ありません? The polite form should therefore be ありません and not ないです, as far as I know


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GilbertoRa168225

    Why is "they don't like vegetables" instead of " i don't like vegetables" the correct answer?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    It can be both. Japanese is a contextual language and the subject is often removed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loki335610

    I translated it as "i doesn't like vegetables" but correct answer was "it" instead "i"... Трындец, товарищи. Я уже не я, а оно...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    "I doesn't" is grammatically incorrect English. It's either "I don't" or, like Duolingo suggested, "it(/he/she) doesn't".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiyamBhushan

    I hate vegetables is also correct


    [deactivated user]

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARMY_In_Distress

      What does the creator of this activity eat?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davis705895

      This is racist towards vegetables


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichD15

      The male vocalization is very difficult to tease out the words.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

      Hey! Why do we have to say "janai desu"? What does it (janai) mean literally?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archrodney

      The short answer is that you have to use じゃない (janai) to express the negative form in a casual way. The more polite way would be じゃありません (jaarimasen).

      Here's a more thorough explanation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

      After all, WHY DO WE HAVE TO SAY THE VERB "DESU" AFTER "SUKI"??!?!?!??! IT DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archrodney

      Well, you need a verb to create a meaningful sentence and in this sentence です (desu) is the verb. Of course, in slang you can usually omit the verb and they'd still understand. So casually they'd only say やさいは好きじゃない (yasai wa suki janai).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeckNyan

      Why is it "好きじゃない" instead of "嫌い" ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector843229

      it didnt accept 野菜

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