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  5. "八時八分です。"

"八時八分です。"

Translation:It is 8:08.

June 18, 2017

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis825.

Hachi ji happun desu :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dongmeix

八時八分です はちじはっぷんです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeshAllysa

What is the pun for??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alonso381257

"pun" is the same as "fun", but when you have "hachi" before "fun", you say it "happun", it's a weird thing of japanese's pronunciation. Also, when you want to say "eight hundred", it's "happyaku", and not "hachihyaku"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astrokimena

Thanks that helped me a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lCvy

this sometimes happen in Japanese, to make the pronunciation easier


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee883180

Can someone explain the pronunciation on this one? Sounds like the second "hachi" is shortened?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kalynn_

It is common for some numbers like 3 and 8 to be shortened with a little つ. Similar to 800 /八百 (はっぴゃく).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen654875

With the minutes (not sure if its just minutes) but yes they are shortened: Hachi pun is happun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UltimateGa447472

So ハ and 八 look remarkably similar... Got a bad feeling I'm gonna mix them up. Especially if the writing is stylized... Is this an issue for anyone in their experience?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LettyLettLett

You'll be able to tell once you read an entire phrase to see what the context is. It's no different thean the English symbol number 0 and the letter O. When we read the whole word/ sentence we know whether the letter O is being used or whether the number 0 is being used. Same thing with your examples you used. One is a number while the other is a sound expressed with Katakana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/visualxeffects

I think in such cases you'd have to look at the context of the sentence or situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miranda863541

I remember that it's "happun" and not "haffun", because I remember hoping that it would be haffun, as in "have fun", but it's not.

SO WE ARE NOT HAVING FUN


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivana_aia

i liked ur comment a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimVu

Any grammatical reason why they shorten "hachi pun" to "happun"? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OddOstrich

I believe it's for the flow of speech. Someone explained in an earlier lesson. It's simply easier to say it that way when speaking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KY_Chan

Yep, it's to do with the flow of speech so that you don't get tangled up mid sentence. Refer to this website for more info. https://japaneseup.com/learn-japanese-time/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nanaleu

八時八分です


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olivier630101

It says wrong for "it is 8:08 o'clock" when this is accepted in other case. Really ?


[deactivated user]

    english is not my first language but i believe you can only say o clock when it's an exact hour, with zero minutes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

    Agreed!

    Also, "8:00" reads as "eight o'clock" so "it's 8:00 o'clock" would be redundant (and also incorrect).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LettyLettLett

    In English, o clock is only used when the minutes are at :00. In your example, you were trying to answer 8:08 so the ''o clock'' cannot be used. If the time was 8:00, you can either write It's 8:00 OR It's 8 o'clock.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThinkerXT

    Can't I say "It is eight eight" ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

    In my corner of the world, we would say "eight oh eight".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LettyLettLett

    When said out loud you would say it '' It is eight o'eight.'' However, when writing it, it is widely taught that you should mostly try to use numeral digits (8:08) to write out time.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/szhang123

    The reason why the second 八 is shortened to hap- is because the reading "hachi" was borrowed from Middle Chinese /piet/ (something like that) where the last -t sound was an entering tone (入声) and sounded like a glottal stop. Because Japanese is a language full of syllables it was difficult for them to make that glottal stop UNLESS another consonant followed after, like 分. And this is also the case with 一,六,七,十 which were all entering tone 入声 where their "normal" forms are two syllables but are shortened to one syllable when connected to a consonant after.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneCenNi

    I keep hearing fun being read as hun, is this normal or because of speakers accent? In some other video I heard fun as in f sound and not h sound ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbassam

    Why does "it is 8:08 now" not work?

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