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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannrkelley

"Des roses ! Merci mon homme !"

March 5, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannrkelley

Is 'my man' actually said in this kind of context? Because in English it's a bit silly to say. It sounds good in French though..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I don't like it either. When you are offered roses, you generally have another nice name for your man: mon chéri, mon poussin, mon amour, mon poulet, mon lapin, mon trésor,... - pick the one you like best! -


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dapetras

haha! I giggled at most of these. "Thank you my chicken!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aurelienche

I agree. « Mon homme » is used by someone speaking to friends and referring to a masculine lover. Be aware that the opposite « ma femme » doesn't work the same way, because « femme » also refers to marriage, whereas « homme » doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannrkelley

Masculine lover, I see. Good to know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannrkelley

Aww they're all lovely. Ok great thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Mon choux? That makes me giggle too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

This how I usually wish my son goodnight: "Bonne nuit, chou !" (singular!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamNoir

Last question said "Des sandwiches" was "The sandwiches". This question says "Des roses" is NOT "the roses" but just "roses"! Why is there no consistency? What could be the reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In this sentence, "roses" translates in "des roses", because the singular would be "a rose" = "une rose". In French un/une have a plural form - des - but the English a/an has no plural form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamNoir

Maybe I need to post my question on the other question when it comes up again. So I understand une rose/des roses. But I don't understand why it doesn't apply to (the) sandwiches.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

It does: "un sandwich, des sandwichs", provided the sentence makes sense:

  • I eat a sandwich - je mange un sandwich
  • they eat sandwiches - ils mangent des sandwichs

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbazzini

So, "homme" can mean either man or human, but "femme" means either woman or wife? :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

yes, you are right.

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