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  5. "きのうかみをきりました。"

"きのうかみをきりました。"

Translation:I got a haircut yesterday.

June 19, 2017

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MigiRight

I got stumped for a while because I interpreted it as "yesterday I cut paper"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

Since no kanji is given, "paper" should be an acceptable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

Or "Yesterday I cut a god" ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

Unlimited powah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerminasDeity

「昨日、神を切りました!」笑


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Although literally this translates to "Yesterday I cut hair", absent any other context the standard interpretation is that the speaker got a haircut. If you actually did cut someone else's hair, you would include the name. きのう一郎くんの髪を切りました。 "Yesterday I cut Ichiro's hair."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

Japanese sentences are usually absent of clarity and chock full of ambiguities that must be inferred


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

I agree, especially when only the hiragana is used for "kami", which in this case could either be "hair" (髪) (often called "kami no ke"髪の毛 for clarity), or "paper" (紙)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasleft

Actually.

It bonds to the Japanese culture, 推し量る、心情を察する.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadameSensei

I disagree. I would have used the passive construction (which Duolingo does not teach) for "I got a haircut."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I've never heard the passive used, don't know if it's a regional thing. I keep my hair short, so I hear 「髪切った?」(kami kitta?) on a regular basis. To me this is the most natural sentence to say that I got a haircut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadameSensei

This isn't passive. :) This is normal polite ますform. Passive would have been 切(き)られました。(Super easy to make in Japanese, by the way but Duolingo doesn't have any lessons for it.) You are just hearing casual plain form. (And maybe you noticed that they dropped the を,too?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

That's what I was saying, that in normal speech Japanese people use the normal form, not the passive, to say that someone got a haircut. I was just wondering if in your experience Japanese people did use the passive in normal speech to say that someone got a haircut, because I never encountered it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadameSensei

Why, yes! (The explanation point is there because I am laughing...) Actually, I HAVE heard passive construction with hair cuts. Funny story: A friend didn't like the hair cut she just got, and so she used "suffering passive." (For those of you new to Japanese, you can often put a verb in passive to give the impression that you are not happy with the outcome. For example, 「父(ちち)が亡(な)くなれました。」 Kind of like saying, "My father died on me."  We call this "suffering passive" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I see, I just cut my hair last week and got all 髪切った?s, so next time I cut it I'll have to listen closely and see if anyone uses the passive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

The zero pronoun is actually "[someone] cut my hair"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbreddit

昨日 (yesterday) 髪 (hair) を切りました (cut)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

The presence of を usually denotes that the verb is a transitive verb, meaning it requires a direct object, in this case 髪. You can add that to help others learn trans ans intrans verbs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FuchsiaMoo

Yesterday i cut a god.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

Hmmmmmmmmm, naruhodo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pajang

Why can't I say, "I cut my hair yesterday"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emma523789

Shouldnt it be kami no ke ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

People usually just say 髪 (kami), but I don't think there's anything wrong with 髪の毛 (kaminoke).

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