"It is not a bathtub."

Translation:おふろではありません。

6/19/2017, 2:40:23 AM

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RyanZaki

Why does it need で

6/21/2017, 4:26:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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You should just see it as ではありません; the negation of です. But if you want to get technical, that bit refers to a state of being. Literally this sentence would translate to something like "it does not exist as a bathtub" - i.e., "it is not a bathtub".

9/8/2017, 12:10:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SSSRoaB
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Oh, it's the construction that also gets shortened to じゃありません [or じゃない for less formality], right? so it's not おふろで _ but rather では etc. ...I think. I hope.

10/4/2017, 11:13:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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Correct: では can become じゃ in spoken (or less formal) language. Reading it as おふろで [etc]... would make で a particle indicating a place or method/tool.

10/17/2017, 1:29:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NelZeroTwo
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Or even ふろじゃない to make it even less formal lol

12/19/2018, 3:19:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kenneth862517

Please correct me if I'm wrong. But I thought that if the "de" is not there the sentence would be: 'there is no bathtub'. Whereas with the "de" the sentence becomes: 'it is not a bathtub'. Also sorry for not writing the hiragana, I'm on mobile and can't find the symbols.

3/12/2018, 12:28:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew120201

I use SwiftKey keyboard and it has a great 日本語 keyboard

4/2/2018, 3:41:21 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelo294754

I wonder ... is it a Sony you got like me and you got SwiftKey keyboard? Or you knew of the SwiftKey keyboard from somewhere else? Anyway... 日本語で書ける :) It's great because it suggests the kanji you need!

3/18/2019, 8:15:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannaha70093
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I downloaded TypeQ. You can create your own design or download someone elses design.

5/29/2018, 7:25:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KX3.
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From what I have learnt so far it seems ません indicates negation or "no".

8/29/2018, 6:54:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/matomatical

That literal translation makes so much sense! arigatou gozaimasu!

11/1/2017, 7:16:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Doodle877582

To teach you

2/5/2019, 2:16:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fradann
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Great minds think alike. I missed that exact character.

10/27/2017, 6:55:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/WayneHouns

I would like to know this.

6/27/2017, 6:29:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jamoozy
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I, too, would like to know what the で is for.

7/4/2017, 12:37:05 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BoomBoomShroom

It is just ではありません – a very polute form of negative from です.

7/5/2017, 4:55:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Pietro460054
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But in other phrases it wasnt used before "wa arimasen"!

3/7/2018, 11:05:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeovis
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That's because we were taking about things existing. "There is" --> "arimasu" "There is not" --> "arimasen" But here, we are talking about an object that exists and what it is. "It is" --> "Desu" "It is not" --> "De wa arimasen"

7/22/2018, 11:27:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JomOFisher

Why does it start with お when other sentences have ふろ without?

6/19/2017, 2:40:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/luckeytree

お is an honorific. You see it in words like おねえさん or otousan. But you also will see in in front of objects like おすし、おふろ、and others. It's not always required but it makes it more polite.

6/21/2017, 12:16:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DKC995785

My confusion is that so far in the lesson, none of the Japanese sentences Duolingo has provided have had the "o" honorific, so how come it is required when we put the sentence together in Japanese? (In other words, how come Duolingo constructs sentences without the "o"/honorific, but requires the students/users to include it to be considered correct?) Seems like a weird inconsistency that needs fixing.

4/23/2018, 3:58:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/hmcliesh1
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why do we need to be polite about a bathtub? Or is it simply just being polite to the person we are talking to? Thus to be very polite we put "wo" in front of everything

4/28/2018, 11:28:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/hmcliesh1
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sorry "o" in front of everything

4/28/2018, 11:29:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KX3.
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Taking a shot at this, I'd think English speakers have the same attitude towards bathtubs or more accurately, bathrooms, e.g. calling it a water closet (W.C.), bathroom, restroom, etc.

8/29/2018, 6:57:05 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/.satsuki
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ふろ souns like 'fujo' when i choice it, WTF

6/18/2018, 7:23:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Edikan2
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Wow, I am not used to でわありません as a negative for です

7/14/2017, 7:25:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/awelottta

ではありません not でわありません

9/1/2018, 4:09:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/aleksio_drago

Do you always need an "o" because i was not given one, and was still marked correct

12/3/2017, 4:59:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jamoozy
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No, you don't necessarily need the お, as it is an "honorific". Including it merely makes the sentence more polite.

12/3/2017, 10:14:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlitosMiranda

Previous exercises led me to think that あります and its negative meant something like "there is/are(n't)". But here, used in negative is more like "it is". Why is this? Was I wrong before? Could I read this as "There is no bathtub", seems quite different.

2/7/2018, 7:09:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KX3.
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From what I have learnt so far it seems ません indicates negation or "no".

According to the tips and notes section, the verb あります is often translated into English as "there is" or "there are" (inanimate objects).

8/29/2018, 6:59:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeovis
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It's all in the "de". "Arimasu/Arimasen" are to exist and to not exist. "Desu" is to exist, but.. Where everything has an "en" precedent for negation, it's hard to imagine what it would be, considering "desen" just sounds downright wrong. That's were "de wa arimasen" comes in. Someone else I the comments explained it as more literally being "it does not exist as a bathtub."

7/22/2018, 11:44:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronja366986

It depends on the sentence. あります is a form of "be" for non living things. When the sentence says for example いすがありません (There are no chairs) like the lessons before が makes the difference on how to put いす in the sentence.

4/18/2018, 11:50:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Juliompires

Why there isn't a particle in the sentence?

12/23/2017, 11:19:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/awelottta

The noun お風呂 (おふろ) does not need a particle when used with the です verb. Think of it in English. When we say "x is y," y isn't the direct object or anything, because "is" (a form of "to be") is a linking verb. It doesn't have a direct object. In Japanese just remember that です doesn't use a particle for the noun that you are connecting it to.

9/1/2018, 4:13:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lukeivan2

It simply doesn't need one based on the context you would be saying this in.

6/24/2018, 6:07:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jilli_ishijima

Theres sth wrong with the pronunciation. :/. It is written as ふろ but the voice over says ふじょ i reported this but it ain't workin

9/23/2018, 1:42:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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Admittedly, the audio isn't great (goes for the whole JP course), but I clearly hear ふろ here.

9/23/2018, 5:03:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Karinakamichi

Why did it pronounce ふろ like ふじょ?

9/27/2018, 5:11:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/francis.zabala

The selection is missing お. I reported it as Correct Answer has and error. Not sure if it's the correct category though

10/31/2017, 10:46:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mithlas1

Technically it's not incorrect, but just "ふろ" doesn't sound natural. I'm not a native speaker, but I've never heard it said without the お.

12/16/2017, 12:29:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Christian.M.o.n

The same thing happened to me

1/4/2018, 10:14:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Otters7

"o" is used for honorifics, but is there a sort of rule for what gets to be honoured and what doesn't? Having parental figures and older people honoured with an o seems pretty reasonable, but it seems kinda odd to talk about "honourable bathtubs" all of a sudden. Any explanations for that exact mechanism? Can any object theoretically have an "o" in front of it?

3/13/2018, 7:19:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ktakn

Why does it says it like fuyo... Instead of furo

3/27/2018, 7:40:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DKC995785

Do you mean, pronunciation-wise? In Japanese, the sound that is indicated with a romaji "r" isn't actually an "r" sound - the sound is actually something between an "r" and an "l" (a sound that, for instance, as a native English-speaker, I can not actually replicate and I'm pretty sure I don't even hear it correctly when I'm in Japan, listening to Japanese people make that sound.) So, when you hear "fuyo," (I hear something slightly different from "fuyo," but I understand what you mean) the program is probably actually pronouncing the hiragana with the correct Japanese sound, but since other languages don't necessarily have that sound, when Japanese gets transliterated into romaji characters, they use an "r" as a stand-in for a sound that's not-quite-r, if that makes sense? So "ro" sounds like "yo" in this context to you, and sort of like "fulyo" to me.

4/29/2018, 2:36:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AdaDenizAdg

Can i use "おふろじゃない。" instead of "おふろではありません。" ?

4/21/2018, 7:01:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeovis
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I think so, but it's super informal. Better to nail down the polite ones if you plan on interacting with native speakers, because I imagine that should be pretty rude. I told understand, though, in coining back to Duolingo after awhile and "janai" is directly what my terrible weeb past conjured up faster than anything is learned here. Oh, high school.

7/22/2018, 11:35:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VittuPerrrkele

Why I can't say おふろじゃない? jyanai and dewa arimasen isn't the same thing?

10/19/2017, 4:43:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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They are the same thing, but they are on different levels of politeness/formality. As far as I know, Duolingo uses only the 'plain polite' forms (~ます, です) in the course. So perhaps if you'd add desu at the end, it'll be ok.

10/20/2017, 7:25:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Christian.M.o.n

Did anyone else not get お in the place with the hiragana?

1/4/2018, 10:14:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jacey845617

I didn't get offered a kore! This lesson is confusing me! It says correct answer was: これはふろではありません。

2/1/2018, 11:37:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeovis
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What! That's definitely wrong. It asked for "it is not", not "this is not." Hopefully they've fixed it, because i didn't have this problem.

7/22/2018, 11:37:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TorresLola1
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Isn't arimasu used for like 'things that are here', instead of like in this sentence 'thingd that are'?

2/6/2018, 10:24:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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Normally (on its own), yes. However, when it includes じゃ (or では, pronounced 'dewa') it's a polite negation of です.

2/7/2018, 4:58:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/shadowspar
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Why does it require 「おふろでありません」, "it (in particular) isn't a bathtub", instead of simply 「おふろでありません」, "it isn't a bathtub"? O_o

3/28/2018, 6:20:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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Because 「おふろでありません」doesn't mean "it isn't a bathtub". It kind of sounds like "it's not in the bathtub", but で would still be the wrong particle for that, since it points to the location of an activity, not a passive state of being.

ではありません on the other hand, is the polite/formal negative for "it is not". This can also be contracted into じゃありません, or written slightly less formal as ではないです or じゃない(です).

3/29/2018, 2:55:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Shinodaka

why not "おふろはではありません"?

4/15/2018, 3:22:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/79867462078

because this is negation of おふろです, not おふろはです

4/21/2018, 11:43:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/aini90

I'm actually confused with "de wa arimasen" with "ja arimasen" which one to use at which situation?

4/20/2018, 3:23:59 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/awelottta

They have different levels of formality.

9/1/2018, 4:17:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Eleni55363
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Whats the difference between "There is no bathub" and "It's not a bathtub" in japanese?

4/24/2018, 5:13:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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おふろはありません(or おふろがありません)= there is(/are) no bathtub(s)

おふろではありません(or おふろじゃないです)= it's not a bathtub

5/19/2018, 2:25:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Emma370870

In what situation would I have to tell somebody "that is not a bathtub"

6/26/2018, 2:11:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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When you find someone in your kitchen sink.

6/26/2018, 3:17:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Gomuj

I cant understand the sentence well :'(

7/13/2018, 11:27:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Diannedeleon

T~T Why Duolingo?! why!! お ではありません

7/19/2018, 12:01:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alesorta
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Why, in this situation, using は or が is wrong?

Example: おふろはではありません

11/22/2018, 8:39:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Imola381487
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is ふろ pronounced as fujo? because that's the only thing I can hear when I choose the word.

1/14/2019, 2:01:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/amayamay123

だいどころありませ Why isn't it accepted?

2/6/2018, 10:19:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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A few things: だいどころ is "kitchen", ありませ needs an ん on the end, and ありません should be preceded by では or じゃ in order to say "it isn't ...".

2/7/2018, 4:56:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/NANINANINANI3

NANI?!?!?!

4/10/2018, 8:48:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NeonMarkov
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It confuses me that ふろ is pronounced "fujo"

6/25/2017, 10:45:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Akira108085

ふろ is pronouced as written: "furo"

7/4/2017, 2:12:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cmorwin
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The らりるれろ characters (ra ri ru re ro) are a unique pronunciation, not replicated in English. We use an 'r' to represent it in Romanji, but its normally kind of a combination between an 'r', 'd' and 'l' sound, all blended together. When you have a native speak it, it gets slurred further from this unique sound and starts getting a little wacky sometimes (sounding like a 'j'). Any time you see these, listen extra carefully and just "monkey see, monkey do", and eventually you'll figure out how its shifted here or there and have pretty good pronunciation without having to hear it said first. Just don't give it a hard 'R' pronunciation and you should be good.

8/10/2017, 5:31:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mithlas1

In linguistics, the consonant sounds referred to are Liquids. English separates them into /r/ at the back of the mouth and /l/ near the front of the mouth. Some languages like Greek also have /ʎ/ which is a little forward of the middle. Japanese treats it all as one sound unit and while it tends to be spoken further back in the mouth there's a lot of dialect and individual fluctuation because Japanese in general considers it one sound unit instead of splitting it.

English speakers have the same issue with the aspirated and unaspirated consonants because we tend to treat it as one sound unit, but in Korean they are separate phonemes.

12/16/2017, 12:35:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GiorgioDeChirico

but why "fu" if it's "hu"?

2/14/2018, 4:09:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alcedo-Atthis
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The two aren't distinguished from one another in Japanese.

2/14/2018, 6:37:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kmn8nKMj

Thank you for asking, it's what I heard too, and the answer cmorwin gave you helped.

4/5/2018, 1:50:43 AM
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