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  5. "たくさん食べます。"

"たくさん食べます。"

Translation:I eat a lot.

June 19, 2017

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yokaimonster

I eat Mr. Taku..... ):P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

たくさんを食べます。まずいです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torianak

My first thought was "I eat Mr Taku", then it was like "mmmm but is missing を..." xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slaveoftheowl

彼は おいしい です!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juani166161

I'll use this as a mnemonic device:

Mr. Taku = たくさん = a lot

Ha, ha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmessjee

The subject of the sentence is ambiguous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes, it's implied. It could be translated as "I eat/you eat/he eats/she eats/we eat/they eat a lot."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emailen

The first impression is "I". If I was talking to someone about someone eating a lot i would use ね to indicate that im commenting about someone else's habit or behaviour... as in "たくさん食べますね". Then it would be sure that we speak of someone else beside ourselves


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes, "I" is usually how it's interpreted - though it could refer to one of the other pronouns if the intended subject is already implied by the context.

The use of ね doesn't necessarily imply anything about who the subject of the sentence is - but it would be weird to say something like "I eat a lot, don't I?" about yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kichroot

I say "I eat a lot, don't I?" to myself on a daily basis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DIProgan

How would you say if you mean people in general like if you're doing a presentation about eating habits. Duolingo don't accept "eat a lot" without the "I".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinkerBell654811

Finally, I can describe myself in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nawm_D_Ploom

What about "Excuse me, I am an apple"? I think that one can be helpful in any and all introductions, myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanCarden8

Does たくさん mean "a lot" as in a quantity of something?? As in, "I eat a lot of food" and not "I eat food often"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelipeMate560330

Words for frequency are zenzen, a(n)mari, etc., nit takusan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naveen.t98

they are not for frequency. although it can be translated that way sometimes. idk if English grammar has a word for it but they describe adjectives (which describe nouns). e.g. ammari yokunai -> not very good; totemo ii (very good)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jayfresh

"I eat lots" seems like a valid alternative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

This sentence seems malformed at first... It doesn't sound as good as "I eat a lot"... Unless you mean you literally eat storage lots! xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielHofm474771

I tried "I eat much", didn't land too well either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sonokenokino

たくさん食べます。

Although たくさん is usually written in kana alone, its kanji is 沢山. So the sentence literally means I eat a swamp mountain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nawm_D_Ploom

Sigh that darnded kanji...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fetedeclarity

"Well of course, you're American."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naveen.t98

当然ながら、君はアメリカ人なの。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertTallai

Why doesn't たくさん require the object particle を? Isn't the verb transitive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

Good question. I think the answer is that たくさん isn't actually the object of the verb here, but an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki-kun

Yes, that's correct. The direct object of the verb would be what you eat a lot of, which isn't specified here since the sentence is about food in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrzechooP

just a thought:
this is under the 'Position' topic, which deals with left-right, bottom-top and so on. What does eating - no matter whether a lot or a little - have to do with position of anything?
Could that be that the eating is sort of 'placing a food in the upper opening of the body'? Or perhaps that the whole process is conducted in some undetermined (and not mentioned in the sentence) position? ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leliel03

This really seems like it should be (You) eat a lot, in the sense of offering food to someone. どうぞ、たくさん食べます。(Here, eat up!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanDale3

You'd have to use たくさん食べて for this, to give someone a command.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

食べます is not the imperative form. The subject could be "you", though, since it's not specified (for instance, if you're just remarking on the person's typical eating habits).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/35volts

Usually translating sentences is first person (I...), questions are third person (Are you...?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexythepotato

So did I hear it right? taksan instead of takusan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadjaCarin1

The u is silent very often in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessen871711

Is を simply omitted here? Or would it be incorrect to include it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steviepeculiar

What would the negative of this sentence be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sgenterlein

I believe it would be たくさん食べません。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

Or あまりたべません ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZedBe3

How to say prescriptive 'eat a lot'? Like 'eat a lot, drink a lot of water etc.'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivam.ks

It would be たくさん食べろ (Takusan・Tabero)or たくさん食べなさい(Takusan・Tabenasai) for a more polite tone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark_Sss

Ok. So technically this doesn't mean "I" eat a lot, the "I" is just implied right? So if this is a direct translation...shouldnt "eat alot" be ok too? True technically doesnt form a sentence though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

It's "a lot", not "alot". But no, "Eat a lot" would be a command in English, and this sentence is not in the imperative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbinero

Imagine a translator would only translate literally. That's half the job! English requires a subject, so the translation should have one. It should be implied from context. As there is little context here, the translation is open to interpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay.hammer

Why is "I eat much" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmpProb

It's incorrect on the English end... Check this site: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/british-grammar/quantifiers/much-many-a-lot-of-lots-of-quantifiers

This sentence is assuming "I eat a lot (of food)" where food is a singular uncountable noun, like "money" in their example sentence "That's a lot of money"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhoebeGlaz

Why is を not included here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CristyanSR

the subject is not stated so it could be he eats a lot, she eats a lot, they eat a lot. The phrase is not stated for present time but for future "Masu" , if it's present time then it would be "Taberu" - "Takusan Taberu". In simple words, it's confusing and is wrong. DUOLINGO FIX THIS!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Wait, wasn't it takusai just a little while ago? Is takusan another form of it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CristyanSR

"Takusan -> a lot." "Chotto -> a little." "Tsukoshi -> a little bit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyle380763

Is there a reason this is not "I can eat a lot"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

That would use the potential form of the verb
たくさん食べられます "I can eat a lot"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cristian565613

I used "I eat a bunch"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HimikoNaga

I thought it was "I eat grass"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/84djxtz

"I eat much" is a more grammatically correct form. As an English major, one should not use "a lot" when he means much. "A lot" should only be used to refer to parking lots, as the expression goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leliel03

No, no modern native English speaker is going to say "I eat much, " and you'll get funny looks if you do say that. "I eat a lot" is much more practical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/84djxtz

No. In formal English—in the workplace and in professional settings—"much" is the preferred adverb. "A lot" may be O.K. to use informally, but not in the work place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Technically speaking, I agree. "A lot" to mean "much/many" is similar to the use of "a bunch." I'm pretty sure it used to be a measurement at one point (i.e., "a bunch of grapes") but became more vague in casual English over time, understood to mean "many/much" as a sort of colloquialism. It's adjacent to hyperbole at this point, I'd say. ("I've told you a million times"-esque, where this phrase actually just means that you've told the person several times and are tired of telling that person the information in question.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

"Much" is mainly used formally in writing and is typically used with negative statements and questions, with the positive exceptions being if it begins a sentence and if preceded by words like "so/too/as/very". It sounds extremely unnatural in a positive on its own like that.

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