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  5. "電車はまだですか?"

"電車はまだですか?"

Translation:Is the train not here yet?

June 19, 2017

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solomai

That's a... weird way to phrase it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desconocido13

Especially for a non-native english speaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonVer3

It's kind of like "Is the train still [coming]"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nivkotzer

Can you explain what this means? Sorry if it's silly I'm not a native English speaker..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

You can say this when you expect the train has arrived already, but it has not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iAmMortos

Wouldn't that be a really rare occurrence in Japan anyway? They're trains are on point. lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

The Japanese or the English phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

If you emphasize the "NOT" then I feel like the phrasing isn't bad. Their trains are so on point that I can hear someone say this in shock


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PyrokidSosa

This is common in English lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yugenli

Yeah... I've heard people use mada this way..so this sentence would be "the train is still...? As in it's still not here..?? It's just not a very direct way of saying it..idk how to explain it lol sorry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derek003

And you might hear a native English speaker say "is the train still...?", but that's non-standard English--asking a question by leaving the last words out for the listener to fill in.

I answered "Is the train here yet?", seemingly the opposite question, but Duo still took it. Go figure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bjorn_SE

"I don't even." as the cool kids say these days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

Our "Well I never." as the refined ladies used to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

Is this something that native Japanese speakers say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noisy-cricket

Think of まだ as "not yet". For any context. So this would be "the train is not yet?" The last word is usually implied, but can be added in the negative (e.g. まだ 行かなかった?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xxyzrzy

Unfortunately the hint just says "yet". Literal translation: Train, yet is? Is the train yet?

It may mean "not yet", but the hints do not let you reach that conclusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denimbluesky

まだ can mean still With out a negative "the train still" is coming? works I get that it's colloquial but it really needs context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schizo_Rhino

"まだまだ" - Genji Shimada


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarboKill

"まだまだ" - Every shounen protagonist ever


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bwizdam

Genji Shiまだまだ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahANpg

まだ can have two meanings after translation: "already" or "yet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bjorn_SE

and apparently also "not yet"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyJe7QcR

If you look up まだ on https://jisho.org/word/%E6%9C%AA%E3%81%A0, you will find that it can also be used as a な adjective, meaning "unfinished, incomplete, not yet finished with". I believe this is what happened in this sentence. Reading it like this, gives much more sense to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaLapine

Shouldn't "is the train still not here" be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tate1650

How is this relevant to this lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mr.PQR

Why is it in the "people" section though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnriqueBoh1

Why is this exercise in this area?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

The train is not here yet... Or not yet here. -.-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vorobya

How then does one ask if the train is still here vs. the train is still not here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

As commenters above have pointed out, まだ is so commonly used with negated verbs/adj., that this phrase just leaves out the verb: "has the train [not arrived] yet?". I suppose that it could, contextually, also mean "has the train not left yet?".

However, if you want to say "still is", you should probably add a (positive) verb: 電車はまだあるか


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rwmchan

is the translation wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rwmchan

why is there a meaning of "not here"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

"Is the train yet to arrive?" So there's no "to arrive" in the Japanese, but c'mon, it's implied. I mean, obviously the train is already built and in operation, put to work on its shift. Is there no option in the affirmative on this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParkerOlsen

the voice actor's gasp for air in the beginning lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmxxiii

I answered "Are there still trains?", as in "Are the trains still running?" but was marked wrong. I think I was too literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

I don't think that's a correct translation, but I put "Is it the train yet", which should really be correct even if it's a slightly unusual way of putting it (you might ask that if there was some noise or indication that something was nearby but you weren't sure what). The word 'here' isn't in the Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

Don't you need "koukou" for it to be "here"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

Under most circumstances, yes. In this case no, not in the Japanese sentence. "Here" is ここ btw (short o's: koko), and as previous comments have pointed out, the literal translation of the Japanese is indeed "Is the train still/not yet?". There's no "here" in the Japanese sentence either, because it's implied.

In Japanese, this is an acceptable way to ask about the train's arrival status. Saying something like "is the train yet" in English would be completely ungrammatical though. So the two sentences are not literal, word for word translations. Same goes for many other Japanese sentences (plus, every language has things like this to some degree).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

"Is it the train yet?" is a possible English sentence, though I agree it wouldn't be common.

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