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  5. "あした日本に行きます。"

"あした日本に行きます。"

Translation:I will go to Japan tomorrow.

June 19, 2017

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trevor212039

B-but I only know enough Japanese to throw a party as an orphan who buys desks at restaurants....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guydht

Although I can tell you the time like a pro!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aAsiara

You already have 10 elder brothers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanM37528

Dont forget our expertise dealing with hat selling dogs in trees.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

Don't forget the fish that swim slowly in the pond in yard of our house either!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelvinBB

RIP entrepeneur dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeuxYeux

Seriously cant stop laughing Nazgul


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElijahWrig414612

Not only that, but the meat might be cheap! Anyone worth their salt only eats EXPENSIVE meat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonVer3

Haha, my thoughts exactly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adir935519

Yeah there's a 24 hour party I am gonna go. There's gonna be a lot of desks and chairs and stuff


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

Tomorrow?! I have to go pack!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

明日日本に行きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishana92

why is there no wa after tomorrow? In examples such as "I did not study yesterday" there was wa after "time expression". Why it is not used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

In such a case the wa is optional.

I believe there's a slight difference in emphasis. With the wa the sentence is about what happens tomorrow; without it it's about you going to Japan, which happens to be tomorrow. If you were drawing a contrast between tomorrow, and other days when you're not going to Japan, you'd want to use wa.

But at this stage "it's optional" is probably all you need to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

I'm going to Japan, but not tomorrow! :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudioDur17

Why is it "ni" instead of "he"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

They're very similar. "ni" means "to" while "he" is something more like "in the direction of". It's less direct but means almost the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyBiddle

I think they're mostly interchangeable, as long as it's directional. 日本へ行きます would mean the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wadokuonegai

This comments got two down-votes, but no explanation. Don't do this, if it isn't wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinnyMinzy

But........idont hve enoigh money


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JapaneseLe4

I wish i knew egnough japanese to do so


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chase-Apollo

"He go to Japan tomorrow" That doesn't sound right at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

"He goes to Japan tomorrow" is fine though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayMilkshake

I'm actually going during the easter holidays. I'm half Japanese :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skgr136

Why doesn't "明日日本に行きます" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxllua

I wrote that too, and there is no option to report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaconHoliday

Why doesn't it accept 明日日本に行きます?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xander479

It does now, just fyi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

明日日本に行きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjcutter12

I would like to ask a question. What is the difference between日本へ行きますand 日本に行きます. I am not sure about へand に


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

As michael.fe4 has explained, に means "to" while へ is a more general "in the direction of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiomcdias

Could I use へ instead of に in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

From what I have gathered, that would be more along the lines of "in the general direction of Japan". In the future, please read through the comments before asking your questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baltihorse

I'm a bit confused. I learned in Tae Kim's guide that the particle に doesn't cover relative time such as 明日(あした) or 今日(きょう), but that it works with time like naming months or days of the week. What am I missing here? Is it because the emphasis is on the location you're going to, instead of when it is that you're going?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhagad

Yep. The に here is for the place 日本. あした doesn't need a particle. Though you could optionally add a は particle as in あしたは日本に行きます. The meaning would change only slightly, putting more emphasis on the fact that you're traveling tomorrow versus emphasizing that you're traveling to Japan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alonely

Wow, Duo is psychic. I am literally going to Japan tomorrow. x_X


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MnhHuy1

Of course,maybe not tomorrow but right after my graduate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rveenn

I wish it was true...


[deactivated user]

    I thought the subject has to be you if the sentence ends in ます


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    No, that's just a general present verb ending. Japanese is a very contextual language so the subject is often omitted if everyone already knows who the conversation is about. It could be "you", but it could also be "I", "he", "they", etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zazdamermou

    に and へ both give the direction but に is giving what you need to do in the direction where you going. But へ giving the direction you are going to (V-ing). Ex: 学校へ行きます。(I am going to school)   学校へ本を買いに行きます (I am going to school to buy the book) So に here used for action you do when you went to the direction you want. Yeah. In the Tips they said ni = to (But seems you all misunderstand it)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevadensis

    Why is there not the "wa" particle after "ashita"? (as for tomorrow...) Also, wow, I love all these coments. The activity lessson has been the most entertainig so far forum-wise!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    From what I've gathered, "wa" seems to be optional in that particular situation and is used to put emphasis on the time specifically. I've tried omitting it in other sentences where "wa" did show up after the time in the example sentence and it was still accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RustyBullet

    Is the "will" really stated in the sentence? Isn't it really just "I go to Japan tomorrow". Bit pedantic I know, but there is a difference between "I will go", "I am going to" and "I go..." subtle but could be important.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhagad

    Take me with you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nana.san

    Good for you... TAKE ME TO JAPAAAAAAN!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JKSot

    Can someone explain the difference between 行きます and 来ます ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aureliawisenri

    more or less, 行きます means 'go' and 来ます means 'come'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilinkx

    Weird flex but ok. *sobs


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaGoov

    tomorrow I will go to Japan is wrong...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horfenico

    明日日本に行きます。is correct but once again you're telling me I'm wrong. This lesson is so bloody inconsistent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BackwardMap

    2 more weeks and I am going!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoisesPonc16

    i feel like they should circle each part of the sentence tk where it lies on the translation i dont think itll hurt


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S.W.Sch.

    Why was "あしたにほんにいきます" regarded as false? The report button doesn't offer the option of reporting that my answer should be accepted. (Therefore I am posting it here)

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