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  5. "さいふをなくしました。こうばんに行きます。"

"さいふをなくしました。こうばんに行きます。"

Translation:I lost my wallet. I will go to the police box.

June 20, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

財布を無くしました。交番に行きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularfanb0y

I thought the naku was fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

魚 (sakana) - fish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marknld

I can't help but think of the TARDIS every time I read police box.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1chope

This is the reason why I think "police office" should be accepted at least as much as "police box". I'll keep reporting it for every exercise where it appears, and hope they will change it soon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Usagiboy7

Is there a difference between a police station and a police box? Where I live, I have only encountered "police station". Reading "police box" makes me thing of that pay phone-looking box from Dr. Who. Thanks for the assistance! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

I think kobans are very small booths located in japan much more frequently than policw stations, and usually only have one to two people in them. Criminals wouldnt be held at a koban but at a police station


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cratesofhi

A police box IS "one of those payphone looking things from Doctor Who" :)

In Japan they are more little office-box-thingies that have a police officer and a computer and a phone inside that you can go to to speak to a police officer or if you're in trouble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medusa747

This would be a great chance to learn conjoined sentence structure rather than posing it as 2 separate sentences.

Like "-blank- happened, so -blank-".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DawnChesbr

The way the first sentence is worded could be taken as you lost the wallet intentionally. This is a perfect place to use しまう to mean "this thing (losing my wallet) happened unexpectedly"

財布を無くしまいました.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

How do you lose something intentionally? And why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

なくす (the word is more commonly written with hiragana rather than as 無くす) can mean to lose something or to get rid of something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chibika1

Perhaps like the bankers from South Park?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marknld

Do you mean: なくしてしまいました?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarryLiang1

I would actually prefer if they used koban instead of police box. Police box means a telephone booth used to call the police.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Funny translation booboo i'm sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mateo883272

just FYI Americans call it a Police station. Jisho.org used the phrase (Ask at the police station over there.) as their sample sentence 向こうの交番で聞いてください.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

We don't have 交番 (kouban) in America, so we don't actually call them anything. A police station is 警察署 (keisatsusho), while a koban is much smaller.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

Why is "I have lost my wallet." I learned you use Perfect in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

The Japanese is in the past tense, and there's nothing wrong with the English in the past tense, "I lost my wallet", so that would be the most accurate translation. That said, Japanese doesn't have a present perfect tense ("I have lost"), so I don't think it's wrong to translate it that way.

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