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  5. "どうぞ。"

"どうぞ。"

Translation:Here you are.

June 21, 2017

91 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

I can see why they used "here you go" but it feels weird to me too. I always thought "if you please" was a closer appoximation-it covers more of the situations of どうぞ like offering a seat or letting someone ahead of you in line


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magical8ball

This a pretty flexible word. Should be used in better context if they expect an exact answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeskalau

I'm currently a foreigner in Japan with only very basic Japanese. Dozo is one of the top 3 words I've used, along with arigatou gosaimasu (thank you very much) and sumimasen (excuse me / sorry). This word is useful to know and to say!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Can confirm, during my study trip "hai, arigatou gozaimashita", "ano, sumimasen", "douzo?" and "sou(desu(ka/ne))" were my most used words, FAR AND WIDE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bavesh01

gozaimashita & gozaimasu... what's the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_redzx_

Both means thank you. "Arigatou gozaimasu" is in present tense. "Arigatou gozaimashita" is in past tense.

For example when you're on the train and a man gave his seat to you, you would say "Arigatou gozaimasu". When the train has stopped and you're leaving the train, you would say "Arigatou gozaimashita" to the man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Srcsqwrn

Ah, thank you! What a nice answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeskalau

Also, I was taught the English translation for dozo as "Here, for you" which might work better for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Just a quick correction or two - 'doUzo' どうぞ, 'arigatou goZaimasu' ありがとうございます.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kay324103

I thought that it was pronounced a little like dozzo うmaking the sound of the consonant longer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dylankai

You would use a small tsu (っ) for that.

Here's an example that uses both the small and large tsu so you can see the difference: みっつ (Mittsu)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omkar763674

No, the 'tsu' character is used for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_redzx_

What you are talking about is called 'sokuon'. Check wikipedia to understand it. And no, that is not the case here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShesTwoTents

So now I see that we (or at least I definitely was) were incorrectly taught in school that どうぞ only meant "Here you go", and is only for when you're giving someone something. Where in fact it is the shortened version of どうぞよろしく which gives it the more "Please" meaning, as in "Please, take this" etc. I am so annoyed that it took 10 years of knowing basic/intermediate level Japanese, having two half Japanese sisters, and a father who has lived in Japan for 25 years for someone to actually share that with me. What. The. Bleep.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natto591178

どうぞよろしく means "please treat me well". It's used like "Nice to meet you." You'd never use it as "Here you go". So rest assured they weren't keeping anything from you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

So is this like an inviting please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielleTea

Thank you for simplifying the meaning really well in just two words. Its so abstract that people are writing a lot to try and explain it (which I appreciate too) but this feels like it makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathanleiby

I said "here" only... Is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

Yes. Despite its brevity, どうぞ conveys much more politeness than the English "here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3alishab

If it was about politeness even "Here you go" doesn't match it. I believe that there is no problem with "Here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariamelawady

This is "here you are" as in the french "voila"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaori39903

I think so, I am still a beginner about Japanese language but I feel like "Et voici" or "Tenez" is often a pretty accurate translation (maybe too specific though?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niallismyslut

if there is a Turkish speaker here who didn't get it; it has just the same meaning with "buyrun"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VelionaVollerei

Arigatou that helped a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shooked

Would an example for this phrase be when the waiter or waitress hands you your food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorruptedMind

Can I translate どうぞ like "help yourself" instead of using tue given translation? P.S Thhis was not accepted, so I am asking the community about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeskalau

Maybe in some instances "help yourself" would be sort of equivalent, but I don't think it matches the level of politeness and true meaning as correctly as "Here, for you." For example, there is one seat left on the train but you see that someone else wants it. You would say [どうぞ]. "Here, for you" is more accurate in this sense, unless you say "Help yourself" in a super nice way that probably only some people can pull off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dumark53

"Please" in English is like "Bitte" in German. You use it when you ask for something, but you can also use it when you offer something. The use of one word is probably a shortened version of something like "May it please you to ..." I think for どうぞ, a single "please" should be considered correct in many cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff995887

I always felt it meant more "go ahead" than anything when I lived in the Kansai area.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

We all know that anime is the best source to learn Japanese. And in anime they often say どうぞ when they give tea to someone, or the shopkeeper hands over the bought products. But it is also used as "go ahead" when you let someone get inside first (for example).
But I wouldn't be surprised if the kansai dialect uses it primarily like "go ahead".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolo660117

In french "je vous en prie"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaMath8

Alstublieft in Dutch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardF.5

This is a cultural expression .. meaning " Please (receive )" the sentiment is difficult for anglo/saxons to concieve ... In french it would be " je vous en prie " in German " Bitte " . It is also used in other cases of courtesy. In the mean time dont worry about it ... Gambatte.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichkyPerm

For Indonesian learners of Japanese (and vice versa), this can be translated as 'silakan' perfectly.

For English learners, think of this as a "reverse please", like a please but you say it when you are on the giving end instead of receiving end. Don't worry about the translations, this is a lexical gap in English and can be translated in a lot of ways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DUSKvsDAWN

Am I the only one who is confused by the answer they expected? I've seen the word used in a lot of different contexts, so this one made me go "uhh.. Ok?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilMissDro

Could this be used like... Waiting in line and someone has less items than you so you say "Douzo", as if saying "Go ahead" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G-M2
  • 230

Yes, absolutely. I translated as "Please, go ahead" and it was accepted. I've lived in Japanese one year and studied Japanese 4 years as my university major.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiffanycandy

I said 'here' isnt that right also どうぞis one word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Aye, actually. However, it's a very nuanced word. With so little context, Duo should arguably accept that but bear in mind that it typically carries a much more polite and complex meaning, depending on the situation where it is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keciro

i'm not very familiar with english, what exactly does "here you are" means? i only can think in the literal meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niallismyslut

imagine you are in the bus and there is one empty seat and an old man with you. You should say "douzo" to let him sit. Or you are having a conversation with someone, after finishing your sentences you can say "douzo" to let that person talk. it 'basically' means "please go on" or "after you". if you didn't get it just let me know. i can simplify it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Q1KS

"Here you are" (or, more commonly, "Here you go") is something you can say (in slightly less formal situations) when you give or offer something to someone. Example: Someone asks you for something, like a drink of water; when you hand it to them, you could say that. Or like if you are offering up your seat on a bus/other form of public transportation for someone who needs it more than you do; that sort of thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyle516067

"Here you are" and "Here you go" are somewhat interchangeable, older generations may be more apt to use "Here you are" but both instances are for giving something to someone. If you were simply declaring that someone is there it would then be appropriate to say "There you are" or "Here you are"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruby176491

Google translator says どうぞ means here you go but Doolingo says it means plese which one is right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

Firstly, let's address the elephant in the room: Don't use google translate. I know it is super convenient (and I must admit that I sometimes use it as well), but you shouldn't trust it. When I use it is is usually to quickly confirm if it means what I think it means. Jisho.com is an online dictionary which I can recommend.

Anyways, back to the topic:
Duolingo also says it means "here you are". But it could also mean "you go first" if you let someone go through the door first. It could mean "please" or "here you go" when you give something to someone. For instance when you give someone some tea. Or the cachier might say it when they hand over the goods you've bought. In English there isn't really one word for it, and "here you go" doesn't really make any sense, especially without context. Since there is no proper one-size-fits-all translation you should learn how and when to use it by listening to some actual Japanese. Or you could try to find a proper source online to get an idea of what it means. But generally you'd say it when you give something to someone or do something for someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Depresso3xpresso

In what context can "どうぞ" be used in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

I heard it a lot when people open the door for you, or make room for you in line, when offering a seat or prompting someone to eat first/try something. Any time you want someone to take advantage of your kindness really


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alberto239632

Any spanish speaker that can translate どうぞ to spanish please? Reading the comments I think that's used like "aquí tienes" when you make something for someone or give something to another person, but I'm not sure :3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

Not a native Spanish speaker but you seem to have the gist of it. It can also be when you do something for someone else like hold the door or give up your seat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cellbisnath

I thought どうぞ means "Please"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/23180776$comment_id=40820328

It is not really the same "please" as when making a request for something in English. It is the "please" you may use when offering something to someone.
In that context "please" and "here you are/here you go" can be used pretty interchangeably; as well as "be my guest/go ahead/feel free to do x"
It is a phrase you would use, for example, when allowing someone in front of you in a line, when giving someone your seat, or welcoming them into your home. "Please, take my seat", "Please, come in"
Or in the same situation you could say "Here you are" while stepping aside and gesturing them to go ahead.
It could also be used when giving someone a gift, offering them another helping of food, or when giving permission for someone to do something.
"Please, accept this gift", "Please, have another plate"
And again "Here you are" could be said when handing that person a gift as well.
There are many many different phrases for this in English and which one you use is mainly just personal preference, but in Japanese all can fall under どうぞ

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/23180776$comment_id=40479675

お願いします uses the noun form of 願う "to wish, to hope, to request, to plea" with the polite form of the verb する「します」 "to do", so "to make a wish/request"
This is a word you use when asking politely for something. "Please give me X" or "Please do X for me"

どうぞ works in the opposite direction, this is like saying "please take this", "here you go", "be my guest" when offering something to someone. It is the "please" when giving a gift, when allowing someone to go ahead of you or take your seat.

Both are sort of prompts for someone else to do something, but お願いします wants something done for the speaker by the listener, どうぞ is the speaker giving something in some way to the listener.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam580902

I keep saying "here" or "take this." "Here you are seems awkward and unnatural to me. Is there a distinction I'm missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

Are you a native English speaker? Because it's natural for non-native speakers to think that "here you are" is awkward and unnatural. It is unnatural to non-native speakers because it actually doesn't make any sense. It's probably something which changed over time due to it being shortened or used improperly which gave it a new meaning.

"here" or "take this" are probably gramatically better suited, but it isn't how native speakers would often speak. (For as far as I'm aware. I'm Dutch, so I could of course be slightly wrong about it).

Someone on Quora asked a question about it, and this is in one of the answers:

"douzo; please, kindly, by all means

used only by itself it most often means 'here you are' when handing someone something, as if to say, 'here you are, please take/have this', or short for "osakini douzo", which is said when you let someone go before or ahead of you." (https://www.quora.com/Japanese-language-How-should-you-translate-douzo-yoroshiku)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buenaRenat

Perdón por equivocarme en una letra para su información no hablo inglés yo hablo en español latino y estoy haciendo mucho esfuerzo de lo que debería in tentando entender 2 idiomas no maternales para mi que es el japonés que si lo quiero y por atro lado el inglés que me vale un comino


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

No soy latina o hablo bien español pero este es como "sí por favor" o "aquí tiene." Cuando hace algo por alguien usted dice "どうぞ".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AomiKami

But isn't どぞ a flexible word which could mean, go on, here you are or more?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G-M2
  • 230

Yes, exactly. It's polite, so I add please, "please go on" or "please go ahead (and take what I'm offering you)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aZuma5565

I DON'T GEt IT :( Where can '' here you are '' even be used ? I'm not Eng native , but it seemed to have the meaning " i found you "

Douzo however has the leaning "here you go" and laybe more , but it isn't clear still Can anyone give me examples ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gluadys

In fact "Here you are" can mean "I found you." But it is most commonly used when giving someone something they have requested. For example, a child asks a parent for a cookie and the parent says "Here you are" (or "Here you go") as they give the cookie to the child. Similarly, if your teenager asks to borrow the car, you would likely say "Here you are" or "Here you go" as you hand her the car keys. And, as mentioned, in a shop, the clerk will often say "here you are/go" when handing over what you have purchased or a waiter will say the same when bringing the food you ordered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

In English "here you are" or "here you go" are pretty interchangeable and are common phrases when giving something to someone. Handing them a present you may say "here you are!", which is a bit nicer and more natural sounding than a more literal/formal sounding "please take this". This is not exclusive to gifts; If someone asks you to pass them something at the dinner table you could still say "here you are/go". If someone wants to go past you while you're standing in front of them and you step out of their way to let them go ahead of you or have your place you could still say "here you are/go".
There isn't really any difference between them, "here you are" sounds a bit more literal like "here is the thing for you", where "here you go" doesn't translate as nicely and is more of a colloquialism. I'd say "here you go" sounds a bit more enthusiastic like you are happy to give something to someone, where "here you are" is more of a neutral statement probably used in response to someone asking for something and you passing it to them.
All of this is pretty much the same usage as どうぞ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisLee104189

here you are? like, you're searching for someone, and you found them, so you say smth like "O, here you are!"?? i thought douso was more like, here you go, or when someone say scuse me and you answer them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

From above

In English "here you are" or "here you go" are pretty interchangeable and are common phrases when giving something to someone. Handing them a present you may say "here you are!", which is a bit nicer and more natural sounding than a more literal/formal sounding "please take this". This is not exclusive to gifts; If someone asks you to pass them something at the dinner table you could still say "here you are/go". If someone wants to go past you while you're standing in front of them and you step out of their way to let them go ahead of you or have your place you could still say "here you are/go".
There isn't really any difference between them, "here you are" sounds a bit more literal like "here is the thing for you", where "here you go" doesn't translate as nicely and is more of a colloquialism. I'd say "here you go" sounds a bit more enthusiastic like you are happy to give something to someone, where "here you are" is more of a neutral statement probably used in response to someone asking for something and you passing it to them.
All of this is pretty much the same usage as どうぞ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nhm0901

I'm a beginner Japanese learner. Please tell me the difference between douzo (どうぞ)and onegaishimasu (お願いします). They both mean "please" according to the translation. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

お願いします uses the noun form of 願う "to wish, to hope, to request, to plea" with the polite form of the verb する「します」 "to do", so "to make a wish/request"
This is a word you use when asking politely for something. "Please give me X" or "Please do X for me"

どうぞ works in the opposite direction, this is like saying "please take this", "here you go", "be my guest" when offering something to someone. It is the "please" when giving a gift, when allowing someone to go ahead of you or take your seat.

Both are sort of prompts for someone else to do something, but お願いします wants something done for the speaker by the listener, どうぞ is the speaker giving something in some way to the listener.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nhm0901

Wonderful explanation! Thanks very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FtQfp8qO

"どうぞ。" "Here you are." or "Please" I typed please and I was right non the less. But the translation can mean two things, this is what I don't understand, yet. Anyone??? I don't want to be guessing all the time and hope what I say is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

It is not really the same "please" as when making a request for something in English. It is the "please" you may use when offering something to someone.
In that context "please" and "here you are/here you go" can be used pretty interchangeably; as well as "be my guest/go ahead/feel free to do x"
It is a phrase you would use, for example, when allowing someone in front of you in a line, when giving someone your seat, or welcoming them into your home. "Please, take my seat", "Please, come in"
Or in the same situation you could say "Here you are" while stepping aside and gesturing them to go ahead.
It could also be used when giving someone a gift, offering them another helping of food, or when giving permission for someone to do something.
"Please, accept this gift", "Please, have another plate"
And again "Here you are" could be said when handing that person a gift as well.
There are many many different phrases for this in English and which one you use is mainly just personal preference, but in Japanese all can fall under どうぞ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luhdajuice

So basically what I am getting from the community comments are:

"どうぞ" , can be used as "Here you are", as if you were handing something to somebody.

"どうぞ" can also be used if if I were to let somebody go into a location before me and I say "Here you go". For example an elder lady is nearby and I hold the door for her to get into a location and I proceed to say "どうぞ" as she walks in.

Right? Please correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G-M2
  • 230

Yes. I also add "please" to it, as "please go ahead (and partake of this food/gift/pen I'm giving/loaning you)" for your first example and for your second, "please go ahead (of me in line/ and take this bus seat).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rrinnlonginus

Looking at the comments, it is now very clear that we cannot use English language as absolute reference when learning Japanese and that every Japanese phrase are used as expressions, not words.

However, I'm not sure if what I suggested is an acceptable statement but so far I treat Japanese like maths.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman_isma

could anyone explain how works どう, どうも, どうぞ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roee790945

"There you go should" not be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

Perhaps it should. Depends on native English usage, and whether the same is meant as "here you go".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranStalli

On NHK's early morning English lessons, the skit once spent half an hour trying to explain a US waitress' "Here you go." Go? Go where? I think "There you are" is a better equivalent when どうぞ is used while giving something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dumark53

That would be a waitress in a diner, not a waiter in an upscale restaurant, say, for the English expression. For such universal "situation phrases," one can only learn social equivalents, not translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoSA124252

I feel like this should be "go ahead", "here you are" is more like "Koko wa dozou"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

"here you are" actually doesn't make sense at all if you think about it. "Koko wa douzo" is partially literally translated, and it gives me the impression that you don't quite know what "here you are" means.

When you have someone over at your house, and you give them something to drink, you'd say "Here you are" or "there you go". And in Japanese that would be "douzo". "koko wa douzo" would (if I'm not mistaken) translate to "here is 'here your go'." which doesn't really make sense..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiratSTorr

Для русскоговорящих : как я понял, どうぞ это русское "прошу", "пожалуйста", как будто что-то отдаешь или предлагаешь.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrickyTriforce

Lol this is a terrible question due to lack of context.. douzo can literally mean anything XD I wrote "please come in" because I wasn't sure what they were getting at exactly

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