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  5. "お金を入れます。"

"お金を入れます。"

Translation:I put in money.

June 21, 2017

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5TZj1

That makes no sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Sure it does. You just need the proper context. For instance, you might put money in to a vending machine. (An alternate translation of 入れます is "insert".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaysonKost

What about a group of friends trying to buy beer and talking about contributing to a pool of money for the purpose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalconFlurry

But there was no context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirko562033

Shouldn't it be "I put my money in" then? They way it is now it seems like I'm inserting something inside the bill, for example, which makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

Your version sounds more natural to me, but it splits the infinitive, which will bring the pedants out of the woodwork, so Duo's version might be safer ;)

Both versions mean the same thing though, grammatically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyrstals

What do you do at a vending machine, or while gambling?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KallenX

Family buys a gift together for dad but someone forgot their share...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anajunk

Maybe not in english but in Japanese it sure does, in Spanish too (my country at least), you guys just don't have an expression for it. An easier way to learn the language would be to stop looking for the english version of everything since even the structures are completely different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjmrozinski

To say "I put in the money" without any other context seemed odd, and I saw that the verb also translates to "count," but "I count money" wasn't accepted. Would that be a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robcutmore

I tried the same answer based on the given hints and it wasn't accepted. According to Jisho, 入れる alone doesn't also translate to "to count", but 数に入れる does. So I'm thinking it doesn't work in this sentence, maybe someone else can confirm.

https://jisho.org/word/%E5%85%A5%E3%82%8C%E3%82%8B https://jisho.org/word/%E6%95%B0%E3%81%AB%E5%85%A5%E3%82%8C%E3%82%8B


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alys.Winter

How is the verb in this sentence pronounced? It goes too fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philallthethings

For ppl that need context; I put money in the vending machine 自動販売機(じどうはんばいき)にお金を入れます。Jidouhanbaiki literally means self running/automatic selling machine ahah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magnus669656

Wouldn't "I insert money" be more natural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ever2662

"Insert" is a perfectly reasonable translation of 入れる.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelDB

I put money in where?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelDB

This sounds like in response to something. Where is the other half of the conversation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelDB

And how is i put the money inside wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnklepac

I wrote "I put in the money" - why is that not considered right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Seems fine. Report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Foraging

Why not "I put money in"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

It's fine. Duo accepts it now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magonreal

What is wrong with "Put in the money."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claine15

An order/command usually uses the -te form of a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steven986698

I tried "I deposit money", but it doesn't seem to be a bank account that I am putting my money in. Is 'money' in this context more likely to be actually inserting physical coins or notes into something, or transferring a monetary value into a total?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

According to Jisho.org and the other comments on this page, it's inserting physical currency somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okappys

日本語としても意味がわかりません。お金をどこに入れますか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessDan

If this was signage, would it more accurately translate to "Put money in"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

No. This is a simple sentence (with an implied subject), not the command form form of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keskelis

Isn't ”に” in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I think に is attached to what exactly you put the object into. Since this sentence doesn't mention what you put the money in and に can't be used just on its own, the verb 入れます (which specifically means "put in", not just "put") is used on its own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerryWallwork

Could this sentence also be written in past tense?

お金を入れました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Put" is the same in the past and the present, so it should be accepted and is worth an error report if it's not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PyroTechni5

I put the money inside- is wrong, Duolingo or someone here, please explain why


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giubbs1

Could it be "The money goes in"? Or do I have to use が for that? お金が入れます?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhys.whit

入れる, "to put in/to insert," is a transitive verb, meaning it needs a direct object to operate on. In this sentence, お金 is that direct object, so it needs the を particle. お金が入れます would, I believe, mean "the money puts [something else] in." I believe that the corresponding intransitive verb is 入る (はいる), "to go in," so to say "The money goes in" you might say お金が入ります。

(Note that there are many of these transitive/intransitive paired verbs in Japanese -- for example, 直す/直る (to fix/to be fixed), 上がる/上げる (to raise/to rise). The transitive verbs take a direct object, the intransitive ones don't.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalconFlurry

I guess "I put money in" was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelDB

I put money in or i put money inside. Okane means money and iremasu means to put in or inside


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelDB

I don't know why they don't have a situation when you would use this. Like a dialogue. That uses the phrase or phrases. Because just throwing it out there makes you wonder when and how to use it. By itself it's a random phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

Me when it comes to ゲーム


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eldcastro

No entiendo la oración en Inglés


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhys.whit

lo dice que "he insertado el dinero" (en algo, como una máquina expendedora). (lo siento, español no está mi lengua materna pero ¡espero que esto sea de ayuda!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corneliusflope

"Put in money" is not accepted? Its closer than the actual answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

お金を入れて。

Okane o irete.

Put in money. (a command)

お金を入れます。

Okane o iremasu.

(Someone) puts money in. (an action)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xmilkfedx

there's zero context for "put in". it marked "count" (which is better grammar) and it marked it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocamora7

I thought "I tuck away my money" was a good attempt but it didn't work out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cris672757

i put money its okay too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJD777

I also tried "I put money," but I got it wrong for not including "in." "In" shouldn't be absolutely necessary here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

入れます (iremasu) means that you put money into something, not that you just put it somewhere. It is specifying the direction in, which is why the word is necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emikaijuin

It should accept "I put money" (equally, it should accept any other pronoun as it's not given but implied). The Japanese phrase does not explicitly state the possession of the money and it shouldn't be required in the English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

It may not specify the possession of the money, but it does specify putting it in something as opposed to just putting it anywhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dai803021

This is the worst, stupidest, most ridiculous alleged "question" I have ever seen in Duolingo, and that's saying something! Good God, how can you guess the context for this one?

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