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  5. "今月はいそがしくありません。"

"今月はいそがしくありません。"

Translation:I am not busy this month.

June 21, 2017

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Very much do not like this one; strongly feel this should be 忙しくない not 忙しく有ません。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

ありません isn't generally written in kanji, especially as the negation of a different verb.

いそがしくない on its own is the informal negation. いそがしくありません and いそがしくないです would both be the more polite form. There are subtle nuances between the latter two, but either one is acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

What happened to "dewaarimasen"?

Isn't "isogashii" meant to be used with "des"?

I never saw "isogashimas" in the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

-i adjectives

忙しいです (isogashii desu)

I'm busy.

忙しくないです (isogashiku nai desu) = 忙しくありません (isogashiku arimasen)

I'm not busy.

-na adjectives

きれいです

It's clean.

きれいじゃありません (kirei ja arimasen) = きれいではありません (kirei dewa arimasen)

It's not clean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bayu21109

How do I bookmark this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

「今月はいそがしくではありません。」would likely be "This month is not busy for me." if I'm not mistaken.

A very small difference, but enough of one to change emphasis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

So ありません is used as the formal animate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

What does ku do? Is it just required for negative of arimasu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davedavido

Adjectives that end in い (often called i-adjectives) are made negative by dropping the い and adding くない.

いそがしい --> いそがしくない.

Other adjectives (often called na-adjectives) just add じゃない to become negative.

好き --> 好きじゃない.

There are a couple exceptions. いい is the word for "good," but it evolved out of the word よい, and that form is still used for negative/past conjugation.

いい --> よくない.

That's by far the most common exception, I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spacebloomers

This is a wonderful explanation, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

Suki isn't a verb?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrismVelocity

Nope. It is in fact an adjective. It better transliterates to "likeable" or "desireable" more than it does to "I like". So for example, 猫が好きです really means "cats are likeable." instead of "I like cats".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rioscac

I think saying いそがしく turns いそがしい into a different conjugation to allow the attachment of ありません, which indicates negation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amajikisuneater

Wouldn't it be "imasu" instead of "arimasu" since you are refering to yourself, a person?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

It has to do with the fact that いそがしい by itself already means "it is busy": all i-adjectives in Japanese carry a tense/auxiliary verb "to be". That means there is no other form of "to be" in this sentence. And like other i-adjectives, the negation of this always takes the form of いそがしくない, not いそがしく いない (いない is the negation of the stand-alone verb "to be" for living things). So, its polite/formal form is therefore いそがしくありません rather than いません, regardless of whether you're using it to describe a day/one's schedule or a person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sorujaa

I've got a degree in Japanese and never have I ever heard a teacher say this. It should be 忙しくないです (it's also worth noting that on my Samsung Japanese keyboard, predictive speach does not suggest -ある as a possible answer)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

いそがしくない on its own is the informal negation. いそがしくありません and いそがしくないです would both be the more polite form. There are subtle nuances between the latter two, but either one is acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinLong00

What is this difference between いそがしくありません and いそがしくない? Don't they both mean the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

いそがしくない on its own is the informal negation. いそがしくありません and いそがしくないです would both be the more polite form. There are subtle nuances between the latter two, but either one is acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeranoJoe

what's the difference between the latter two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

ないです (nai desu) is more common in speech, while ありません (arimasen) sounds more literary and quite formal when spoken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DustInCompetent

the -く makes いそがしく an adverb, right? So does this technically translate to "This month doesn't exist busily"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rioscac

In this case, grammatically, is いそがしく a noun or an adjective?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomMaurer4

Neither, it's an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rioscac

Ooh. So it's like "This month I do not busily exist."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Even if you conjugate the adjective, it's still modifying the subject of the sentence rather than the verb, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASleepingRock

But only in the sense that ある is used here. If any other verb was there instead of ある, then should the conjugated い-adjective not act like an adverb when used in front of the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You're right. But in the case of ある,if 忙しく (isogashiku) is considered an adverb, then is 忙しかった (isogashikatta) also an adverb? And 忙しくなかった (isogashikunakatta)? The 'conjugated' form of the adjective are used in the same grammatical structure as the 'non-conjugated' adjective, so visualizing them as adverbs just doesn't work for my brain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhaphazard

Is anyone else getting a 今 with a diagonal middle stroke?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimGrabosk

Why isnt it isogashikunai?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

That should also be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemonAnivia

Should be "isogashikunai desu" because thats how you modify the -i adjectives. The past tense would be "isogashikunakatta desu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrismVelocity

Nope, this form is correct too. Did you know that "aru" is an irregular verb? I didn't, until about half a year ago. Do you know what the plain version of the polite "arimasen" is? It's "nai". yes you read right, it's not "arunai", just "nai". This is where the provided "isogashiku-arimasen" comes from; it's really a polite conjugation of "isogashkunai".

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