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  5. "Please call me Tanaka."

"Please call me Tanaka."

Translation:田中と呼んでください。

June 21, 2017

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RCLNerd

田中と呼んでください。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seguren

I'll add that the plain form of the verb is 呼ぶ (yobu) for anyone trying to look it up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmorwin

Still not accepted Jan 1, 2019...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicodraxus

As of Oct 23, 2018, "呼んだ isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/capnsol

Why is the "to" in here? I don't remember needing this (although I haven't taken a class in 10 years)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roostalol

と is used to mark the end of a quote, so here its's like saying: call me "Tanaka."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebuuilt

just like tte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderM347255

Yes, but 「-って」 is the casual version of 「と」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/You451224

I guess it's there to say "call ME". If there was a "wo" instead of "to" for example, the sentence would mean "please call John" and not "please call ME John". But I am not that sure about it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilanDian1

Why not itte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy91164

That would be a little closer to saying, "Please say 'Tanaka'" rather than "Please call me Tanaka."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonTempl904058

No, 言う is often used with the meaning of being called, as in 田中と言います, I am called Tanaka.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrbos

Why wouldn't you say 'tanaka-san to yonde kudasai'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilanDian1

No one can use -san for himself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suetois

I think it would be considered rude to add an honorific to your own name, so Tanaka would not tell you to call him Tanaka-san. (However, it would be normal and polite to add it when you did say his name even though he didn't tell you to.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeAllenSt

Yeah this is a difficult one. Imagine then calling him Tanaka with no san... that would be VERY rude.. but if you are not a native, you would not know..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steel_String

It works similarly in formal situations in English. "Hello, I'm Hiroshi Tanaka." "Right this way, Mr. Tanaka."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blub231

Oof, I read this as "Please call me, Tanaka."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aphirst

Why is と言ってください rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiaYang19

で isn't available.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jochenau

Just a note that on occasion you'll see the kanji 下 in ください: 下さい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruggero211024

田中と呼んでください is not an accepted translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara7777

What's the difference to "Please call Mr./Ms. Tanaka"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

田中と呼んでください。Please call me "Tanaka". (note the と particle marking quote)

田中さんを呼んでください。 Please call Mr. Tanaka. (note the を particle marking direct object)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy91164

There isn't really any, except the context of the situation. The only difference in the actual grammar is that if I were asking you to call Mr. Tanaka, I'd probably say "Tanaka-san." But if I'm asking you to call ME Mr. Tanaka, I would never add "san" to myself. "san", "sensei" or any other title are only used for other people. So there is a little clue there. But the real issue is that there are lots of Japanese sentences that are ambiguous without knowing the context. But the situation that you are in when you hear the sentence should clear up the ambiguity.

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