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  5. "ナイフをください。"

"ナイフをください。"

Translation:A knife, please.

June 21, 2017

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadykit

Should "Can I have a knife please?" work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura209845

Why doesn't "may i have a knife please" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WunderDrew

It should be correct. You should flag the question if it happens again. This program is still pretty much in beta so it helps the ptogram get better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyONeil

Yeah, this bothers me too. I was always taught thatください (下さい) is "please". In this context it is how to ask for something, so you could say it has the same literal meaning as "can I get", but that feels more casual than ください. I've noticed they'll swap between between formal and more casual versions of a phrase and give it the same English translation. That's not "wrong", per se, but I really wish they'd let you know which version is which. Being informal in English can be perceived as friendly and approachable, but in Japanese it's much easier for it to be seen as disrespectful (or overly familiar).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManoahKun

They employed Yuri?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidd1235

Does the "can I get a <noun>" sound really impolite to anyone else? Maybe it's just me being a soft Canadian...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelBer783882

No, that IS impolite. You ask "MAY I have..." Or if you're direct or with friends "a knife, please". Maybe it's an Americanism? They do treat the language rather casually on the whole.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura209845

I'm a Texan. It sounds terrible to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barry_cantin

Same here - "Can I get" is not only impolite, it's incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TenomeTenebrae

Japanese dont have their own word for knife? Did they not use knifes, before english came?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanagiPablo

I think ナイフ is not generic knife but the one you use with a フォーク


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanese_Neko

There is 刀 katana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleWhole

刀 is the word for "knife" in Chinese, does 刀 (かたな) only describe katanas or can it be used to describe regular knives?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filip848824

That's a weird thing to order from the menu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikaAsuna

A knife, please.

ナイフをください。

naifuwokudasai.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

Can someone explain "ナイフ" to me? Does it specifically mean a butter-knife? If I was asking for a sharp knife for steak (or whatever) would I use "ナイフ" or something else? And I assume Japanese has words for things like daggers already.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelBer783882

Knife is what it says, knife is what it means. It's any kind of knife, from a butcher's 'chopper' (that has a specific word for it too, but is a ナイフ), down to butter-knives. It's like the English word and just as broad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janina15988

Could?May/Can I have a knife please? "Get a knife" does not sound natural in Br Eng. It sounds like I am asking for permission to get up and get it myself, which is not the meaning in Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWong60254

ナイフを下さい。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Note however that 下さい/ください is generally written in kana only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Casento

How would you say "one knife, please"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWong60254

The counter word for knife is 丁, so it would be「ナイフを一丁ください」。You can also use 本。

https://www.benricho.org/kazu/database/csv_search.cgi
https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-counters-list/#section-175


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rikimaru16

Shouldn't there be a counter somewhere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernesto813220

I think not, because it is asking for THE knife instead of asking for ONE knife.

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