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"My grandmother has bad hearing."

Translation:私の祖母は耳が悪いです。

June 21, 2017

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david631423

When using soba, no need to use "watashi no" as soba already implies ones own grandmother and also no need for desu at the end depending on formality.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

*Sobo, please do not eat your grandmother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaximusTeo

yeahhh, and if you wanna refer to someone else's grandmother you would use 彼のお婆さん (obāsan) right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Yes, but お婆さん is actually used for "old woman", while お祖母さん is used for "grandmother", but really you usually just write it in hiragana: おばあさん


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaximusTeo

precisely. by the way does it make sense if i there's a ん at the end?

祖母の耳が悪い【ん】です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt-528

I wrote that and got marked right. I'm still learning but as I understand it, 「んです uses a bit of the speaker's judgement on the statement. So I think so. I'd love for someone to clarify it if im wrong though :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ewpettus

んです and its other forms (such as んだ、のだ、ので) are used to indicate an explanation. Tofugu explains it pretty well at https://www.tofugu.com/japanese-grammar/explanatory-nda-ndesu-noda-nodesu/. For example, it's Sports Day and your kids are supposed to be at school for the big performance with their class. You're at the bus stop with your daughter, but your son is missing, and the teacher looks surprised and disappointed when you say he isn't coming today. You feel her uncomfortable stare and admit -息子のお腹が痛いんです。 -むすこのおなかがいたいんです。 -It's because my son's stomach hurts. Without んです it still says that you're son's stomach hurts, but now it's a random statement not inserted in the rest of the conversation. んです clearly ties it in as an explanation to the previous question (or, in our case, the implied question) Tl;dr it means that you're providing an explanation or extra information


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MessSiya

by the way does it make sense if i there's a ん at the end?

It's okay to use it, but it would slightly alter the meaning. んです is more or less untranslatable. But the overall nuance is

  • 「悪いです」:it is bad.
  • 「悪いんです」:it is getting pretty bad (as when comparing to what it used to be).

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasCayt

"Soba" means noodle but it is a common mistake and is sometimes used as a joke. "Sobo" was used in my sentence for grandmother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara_han

Is そぼの耳がわるいです incorrect? If so, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Damitris

It is correct. Duolingo is just weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rogerimp

Seems a little rude when put this way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

It seems it to us, but people are always asking me 目が悪い (me ga warui?), so I think using "warui" is a normal way to express that someone can't hear well or can't see well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathaniel.NZ

Yes it seems to be normal, but I really dislike how disability is described like this. More sensitive expressions are needed. Even 耳が遠い is better than 悪い.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p7CH3

祖母は耳の悪い?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

の is used to connect two nouns, but 悪い is an adjective. You might say 耳の悪い人 (mimi no warui hito), a person with bad hearing, where 人 is the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahMolas

Weird that you get incorrect marks if you don't add "desu" at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/F861318

depends of the phrases sometimes it's ok if you omit it, sometimes it's not. Sometimes duo wants you to use the plain form, sometimes the polite form ¯_(ツ)_/¯


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deepfriedmcrib

The mother is the subject


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/parasology

Why can't I use more kanji in my response?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

If you submitted an error report, it will eventually be added to the possible answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tperson5

I think "うちの" should be taught instead of "わたしの" for family. I wouldn't even use "わたしの" for my cat because it's a part of my "home base"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vcfvct

私の祖母は耳が悪いです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asallam_Sensei

would "my grandma is deaf" be ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

If someone has "bad hearing", they can still hear a little, especially with the help of hearing aids. If someone is "deaf", they can't hear at all, which I think would be better translated as 耳が聞こえない (mimi ga kikoenai).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sellorio

can't use だ instead of です here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

No, 悪い is an i-adjective, so it can't be followed by だ.

  • 私の祖母は耳が悪いです。(polite)

  • 私の祖母は耳が悪い。(casual)

Read more at Tofugu: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese-grammar/da/#using--with--adjectives-and-verbs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyriamCordaro

おばあさんは耳が悪いです。was not accepted.

I thought おばあさん meant "my grandmother" ? Is my translation wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

It sounds correct to me. I think if you submitted an error report saying "my answer should be accepted", it should be added to the possible answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockursoxoff025

"そば" ="grandmother"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkwinx

It was a typo I think. It is fixed now.

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