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  5. "おはよう!"

"おはよう!"

Translation:Good morning!

June 21, 2017

84 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

Utah to you too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorPate7

O-ha-yo-u, Japanese and Spanish are very friendly between them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyLongNum

Sí. Lo malo es que no hay apps en español que te enseñen a hablar japonés :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael319339

I didn't even realize that all of the comments are in English. That must suck :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arm0ir_X62

Podrías aprender inglés y luego aprender japonés desde allí: V


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanMolano2

Yes, because pronunciation in spanish is not flexible (like english), so it's pretty straight-forward to a spanish speaker to know the correct pronunciation of most japanese words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldenEagl266986

Isn't "good mourning" a typo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

Yes, unless you're a member of the Addams Family. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliocesar159

Nailed it hahahahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orchestefa

Thanks, you made the day (is this the just expression?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael736602

When pronouncing はよ I seem to end up saying it more like は(い)よ. Is that just normal when the second part is や, ゆ, or よ, or is it important to make sure I pronounce it as a flat は instead of は(い)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Yes it is normal. I think because the y sound at the front of ya, yu, yo you end up getting some i sound.

In oral Japanese it is common though that いやだ (meaning no/hate it) is shortened to やだ because of exactly this reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nirosu

Well, in japanese, other than really specific rules, you pronounce all syllables as they are, unlike english where you have words like car & care that have different beginings.

It's like the desu in the end, for an english speaker it sounds like dess, but the thing is it's just fast, and to make a longer syllable you use a,i,e,u,o or a small (tsu) which is used for doubling syllables if I am not wrong, like in theend of the sentence, you have ohayou, the u here extends the sound, just like in no : iie, it's ee-ye, it's i-i-e.

In other words, yea, you should say o ha yo, but it feels natural for english speakers to add a bit of "i" in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

"i" and "u" are de-voiced/dropped when they're around unvoiced consonants. It has nothing to do with speed of speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CandiLucky419

Yes, I'm a morning person; I live in the state of Ohayou.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orchestefa

Very funny, congrats XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

i live in ohio and every morning i'm like: ohio ohio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheezyCEA

Good morning from ohio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nejy91

Isn't Ohayo more similar to Morning and Ohayo gozimus to Good morning in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

To an extent, yes, but I don't think the difference in politeness is as clear cut in English. Sure, just saying "morning" is a bit more casual in English, but you could get away with saying that to your manager at work, whereas you can't really do that with おはよう...

And it's ohayou gozaimasu ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GGmZjs

They should really put explanations in the bottom on which ones are formal and which are informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoureeceGa1

おはようございます!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peppersqueaks

Can confirm that "top of the mornin to ya" is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slapz

just curious but why the "!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannahsox

Is the 'u' silent or something? It's spelling insinuates oh-hi-yo-u, but that isn't how it's pronounced


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

When "o" or "e" is pronounced long, it diphthongizes and they reflect that in the hiragana spelling.

Long "e": /eɪ/
Long "o": /oʊ/
http://www.yorku.ca/earmstro/ipa/diphthongs.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JKurono

おはよう, O-ha-yo-u, if you say it slowly you will notice the U, bur if you say it fast you will not. Like for example, でずか, desu ka, say it slowly you, you pronunce all the syllables, but saying fast, it sounds like you only say deska. Hoped that helped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arrekin

There is no 'u'. In this case it stands for double o. So it is like O-ha-yo-o. The o sound is longer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

Yes, and a long "o" becomes the diphthong /oʊ/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay10385

i keep forgetting the symbols to all the words but it never ceases to amaze me that i know only this one by memory


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianFern852571

Porque esta enojaio ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazene_Ame

I feel like this would translate better into the more casual, "Morning!", as opposed to, "Good morning!". Since おはよう is a more casual form of おはようございます.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Costantinos_g

Ohayo gozaimas is also correct (politer version).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephT.Madawela

Now i remember this when conan used iowa instead of ohio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas964839

Para lembrar mais facilmente imagine que o sol raiou. "ohaiou"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbzlotrfan

My teacher in high school also taught us to add gozaimasu to the end of this but didn't explain (if I recall) which was (in)formal and or which to use it with - I.E I meet one of you in actual life which would I use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

"Gozaimasu" is added to be more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flerberderp

Just saying "morning" counts it as correct. When it's missing ございます, ot another type if ending, i think of it is as more informal, therefore "morning"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSmith148943

Really it is just "Morning" (with a positive feeling) just like in English as an interjection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe823737

You can type in 'hello' and it still takes it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiljona

Yes, おはよう can sometimes be used as a greeting too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bennobo

What the difference between おはよう and おはよう ごさいます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

The second one is more formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feneku1

So many different ways to say "Good morning". Ça me fait penser à ce qu'on trouve en français... "Bonjour", "Wesh", "Salut", "Coucou"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orchestefa

Wesh? Êtes-vous sincère ? Merci, je n'avais jamais entendu ni lu telle parole. Pardonnez-moi, est-ce que ce mot a une signification précise ? Ou un emploi spécifique ? Merci si vous pouvez me répondre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hisui2003

おはよう = Morning (Casual) おはようございます = Good Morning (Formal)

And this is what my Japanese teacher told me soooooooo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliHurst1

Good morning Ohio!

Or "Oh! Hio!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VicenteRIV106194

Plz help me, do y'all know how to write "おはよう" phonetically? And is the "う" silent ? THANKS !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

お = O
は = Ha
よ = Yo
う = U

The う is not silent. It extends the お part of よ into an /oʊ/ diphthong, just like long O in English. え extends the い sound into an /eɪ/ diphthong, just like long A in English. Japanese has different vowel and consonant lengths. Pronouncing something short or normal or long makes a difference.

Also be mindful of half-size characters. The chart below shows how the small ゃ, ゅ, and ょ, which change the vowel of the previous character. There is also the small っ, which means the consonant sound of the next character is pronounced twice as long (and if it comes at the end, it means the consonant sound of the previous character is pronounced half as long).

http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/hiragana


http://www.neverup.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/katakana-hiragana-chart-desktop.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyneryMony

Why おはようございます is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_ya.boi.ryan._

I think it's so great that if a Japanese person moves from Japan to Ohio, they just say "ohayou" and people just think they're saying the name of the state


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emimikyu

I thought it meant goodmorning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

"Good morning" is two words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flutterbat2

I love how if you do the basics you will already know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atsukiz

Which is more formal ; おはよう or こんにちわ ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

It's こんにちは and not こんにちわ because the は is a grammar particle and not part of the phrase.

こん = this
にち = day
は = topic marker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Both are informal.

The more formal versions for the two phrases (former is good morning and latter is good day) are おはようございます and こんにち


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrisGross1

Why is "Konnichiwa" not "Good morning" since "Konbanwa" is "Good evening"? So confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

おはよう literally means "It's early", which makes it a good way to say "Good morning".

The breakdown of what "konnichiwa" literally means is elsewhere on this page.

こん = this
にち = day
は = topic marker
"As for this day..." not "As for this morning..." As we would say, "Hello".

"Konbanwa" is
こん = this
ばん = evening/night
は = topic marker
"As for this evening..." Or as we would say, "Good evening".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrisGross1

What you're saying then is "nichi" means "day" and not "morning". Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

Yes. You're welcome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbyRahmanK

ohayou sekai good morning world~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olivetreef1

What is the difference between ohayou and ohayou gosaimasu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

Formality/politeness. The longer forms are typically the more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas375213

moin le pas dakor la seulement


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shella950948

What's wrong? I answered 'good' only, I thought that 'good morning' is 'ohayyo gozaimasu' but it's 'ohayyo' only, can someone explain it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

Don't expect the words to line up like that. It's not a matter of "ohayou" means "good" and "gozaimasu" means "morning". For one thing, "-masu" is a verb ending. It also can come after "arigatou", which means "thank you".

The basic greeting is "ohayou" and literally means "it's early". "Gozaimasu" is something you add onto things when you need to be polite. It is literally just a formal form of "it is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minaho19

なんで疑問形なんだよw


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2333

To teach us vocabulary. Why else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mackenzie842936

Stop with the hiragana, duo!

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