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  5. "おはよう!"

"おはよう!"

Translation:Good morning!

June 21, 2017

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldenEagl266986

Isn't "good mourning" a typo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yes, unless you're a member of the Addams Family. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orchestefa

Thanks, you made the day (is this the just expression?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seokjinlaughs

I learned Ohayou means Good Morning but when I clicked "hello" by mistake it was correct! How?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

"Hello" is a general greeting that can be used at any point in the day, so it can be applied as a translation to any greeting. "Good morning" is the preferred translation as this is specifically a greeting done in the morning (or in the early stages of something such as a work shift), but 'hello' wouldn't be incorrect as 'hello' has no time restriction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael736602

When pronouncing はよ I seem to end up saying it more like は(い)よ. Is that just normal when the second part is や, ゆ, or よ, or is it important to make sure I pronounce it as a flat は instead of は(い)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Yes it is normal. I think because the y sound at the front of ya, yu, yo you end up getting some i sound.

In oral Japanese it is common though that いやだ (meaning no/hate it) is shortened to やだ because of exactly this reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nirosu

Well, in japanese, other than really specific rules, you pronounce all syllables as they are, unlike english where you have words like car & care that have different beginings.

It's like the desu in the end, for an english speaker it sounds like dess, but the thing is it's just fast, and to make a longer syllable you use a,i,e,u,o or a small (tsu) which is used for doubling syllables if I am not wrong, like in theend of the sentence, you have ohayou, the u here extends the sound, just like in no : iie, it's ee-ye, it's i-i-e.

In other words, yea, you should say o ha yo, but it feels natural for english speakers to add a bit of "i" in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"i" and "u" are de-voiced/dropped when they're around unvoiced consonants. It has nothing to do with speed of speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nig.res

I have this thing myself so i found a way to pronounce it better. Usually when we are speaking we don't open our mouth a lot. So if you open your mouth a little more while pronouncing "は" the little pause might help. At least, it worked for me. I hope it helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nejy91

Isn't Ohayo more similar to Morning and Ohayo gozimus to Good morning in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

To an extent, yes, but I don't think the difference in politeness is as clear cut in English. Sure, just saying "morning" is a bit more casual in English, but you could get away with saying that to your manager at work, whereas you can't really do that with おはよう...

And it's ohayou gozaimasu ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GGmZjs

They should really put explanations in the bottom on which ones are formal and which are informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazene_Ame

I feel like this would translate better into the more casual, "Morning!", as opposed to, "Good morning!". Since おはよう is a more casual form of おはようございます.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SLY.Fet

In that case, people would think that it's just a word meaning "morning" (あさ, if I'm not mistaken) and not a greeting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In English, plenty of people greet others with "Morning!" and their tone of voice makes it obvious that it's a greeting and not just a random word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hisui2003

おはよう = Morning (Casual) おはようございます = Good Morning (Formal)

And this is what my Japanese teacher told me soooooooo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannahsox

Is the 'u' silent or something? It's spelling insinuates oh-hi-yo-u, but that isn't how it's pronounced


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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When "o" or "e" is pronounced long, it diphthongizes and they reflect that in the hiragana spelling.

Long "e": /eɪ/
Long "o": /oʊ/
http://www.yorku.ca/earmstro/ipa/diphthongs.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JKurono

おはよう, O-ha-yo-u, if you say it slowly you will notice the U, bur if you say it fast you will not. Like for example, でずか, desu ka, say it slowly you, you pronunce all the syllables, but saying fast, it sounds like you only say deska. Hoped that helped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe823737

You can type in 'hello' and it still takes it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiljona

Yes, おはよう can sometimes be used as a greeting too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrisGross1

Why is "Konnichiwa" not "Good morning" since "Konbanwa" is "Good evening"? So confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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おはよう literally means "It's early", which makes it a good way to say "Good morning".

The breakdown of what "konnichiwa" literally means is elsewhere on this page.

こん = this
にち = day
は = topic marker
"As for this day..." not "As for this morning..." As we would say, "Hello".

"Konbanwa" is
こん = this
ばん = evening/night
は = topic marker
"As for this evening..." Or as we would say, "Good evening".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrisGross1

What you're saying then is "nichi" means "day" and not "morning". Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yes. You're welcome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeruzalenM

is ohio just saing morning or the whole sentense good morning? im confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's best to stop thinking in terms of "word = word" and start thinking in terms of "we say X in [language 1] in this context and they say Y in [language 2] in this context". Especially with two very different, entirely unrelated languages like English and Japanese. Different languages say different things differently. Things are not going to translate cleanly.

Please read the other comments on this page for more details.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atenatheawkward

I realized that Duolingo despite its entertaining way of teaching, doesn't really explain some things. Like grammar. I decided the use another source of knowledge, a book called genki. It was recommended so I started it. It's good so far and i wanted to tell others like me try it too. I don't know why i said this but I thought maybe this helps ya


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbzlotrfan

My teacher in high school also taught us to add gozaimasu to the end of this but didn't explain (if I recall) which was (in)formal and or which to use it with - I.E I meet one of you in actual life which would I use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Gozaimasu" is added to be more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olivetreef1

What is the difference between ohayou and ohayou gosaimasu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Formality/politeness. The longer forms are typically the more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennSomma

i know that it is very weird that duo doesn't accept just ohayo instead of ohayo gosimasu but i think it's just to be polite


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

This is the sentence discussion page for おはよう so I'm not sure what you're referring to,
If it was a translation question you will need to translate to "good morning", if it was a "type what you hear" question おはよう would be the only acceptable answer because there is no ございます in this sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penah945

Can i just type "morning" because it simple and short


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yemsss1

Is adding gozaimasu like a formality?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ragmondy

"good morning" was wrong because I didn't asd the "!", are you serious?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

Duo doesn't grade punctuation (nor does it provide it in the word bank) but without seeing your answer exactly as you put it we won't know what actually happened.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atsukiz

Which is more formal ; おはよう or こんにちわ ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's こんにちは and not こんにちわ because the は is a grammar particle and not part of the phrase.

こん = this
にち = day
は = topic marker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael827661

What is a topic marker? Is this something used in linguistics?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's certainly something used in Japanese.

A topic marker marks the topic. The thing we're talking about, not necessarily the grammatical subject. X は can be thought of as "As for X..." or "On the topic of X..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Both are informal.

The more formal versions for the two phrases (former is good morning and latter is good day) are おはようございます and こんにち


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feneku1

So many different ways to say "Good morning". Ça me fait penser à ce qu'on trouve en français... "Bonjour", "Wesh", "Salut", "Coucou"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orchestefa

Wesh? Êtes-vous sincère ? Merci, je n'avais jamais entendu ni lu telle parole. Pardonnez-moi, est-ce que ce mot a une signification précise ? Ou un emploi spécifique ? Merci si vous pouvez me répondre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cybele649477

Wesh Wesh : Jamais entendu. Cela se dit peut-être dans les banlieues nord de Paris chez les immigrés d'Afrique du Nord. Cf le film "Wesh Wesh, qu'est-ce qui se passe ?" de 2001 (https://www.filmstreamvf.fr/wesh-wesh-quest-ce-qui-se-passe/) et "Wesh Cousin" de 2004.

Hypothèse confirmée : Ce n'est pas vraiment français. (https://blogs.mediapart.fr/hazies-mousli/blog/221015/la-veritable-histoire-du-mot-wesh) et (https://www.dictionnairedelazone.fr/dictionary/definition/wesh).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VicenteRIV106194

Plz help me, do y'all know how to write "おはよう" phonetically? And is the "う" silent ? THANKS !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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お = O
は = Ha
よ = Yo
う = U

The う is not silent. It extends the お part of よ into an /oʊ/ diphthong, just like long O in English. え extends the い sound into an /eɪ/ diphthong, just like long A in English. Japanese has different vowel and consonant lengths. Pronouncing something short or normal or long makes a difference.

Also be mindful of half-size characters. The chart below shows how the small ゃ, ゅ, and ょ, which change the vowel of the previous character. There is also the small っ, which means the consonant sound of the next character is pronounced twice as long (and if it comes at the end, it means the consonant sound of the previous character is pronounced half as long).

http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/hiragana


http://www.neverup.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/katakana-hiragana-chart-desktop.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shella950948

What's wrong? I answered 'good' only, I thought that 'good morning' is 'ohayyo gozaimasu' but it's 'ohayyo' only, can someone explain it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Don't expect the words to line up like that. It's not a matter of "ohayou" means "good" and "gozaimasu" means "morning". For one thing, "-masu" is a verb ending. It also can come after "arigatou", which means "thank you".

The basic greeting is "ohayou" and literally means "it's early". "Gozaimasu" is something you add onto things when you need to be polite. It is literally just a formal form of "it is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hatsuneblue

Ohayo gozaimasu is a polite way of saying good morning. I guess 'morning' be a less polite way and be a way of saying good morning?

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