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  5. "かのじょの本はちょっと長いです。"

"かのじょの本はちょっと長いです。"

Translation:Her book is a little long.

June 22, 2017

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samuelmiscik

Maybe this can be useful for some of you

中 (naka) - Middle, Inside ⚫️ 外 (soto) - Outside ⚫️ の間に (noaidani) - between ⚫️ の前に (nomaeni) - in front of ⚫️ の後る (nooshiro) - behind ⚫️ となり - next to ⚫️

左 (hidari) - LEFT ⚫️ 右 (migi) - RIGHT ⚫️

小 (ko) ⚫️ 小 さい (chiisai) - small ⚫️ 大 (dai) ⚫️ 大 きい (ooki) - big ⚫️
ふるい - old ⚫️ あたらしい - new ⚫️

長い (nagai) - long ⚫️
短い (mijikai) - short ⚫️

たくさん - A lot of ⚫️ ちょっと - A little bit ⚫️

本だな - bookshelf ⚫️ れいぞうこ - fridge ⚫️


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichieRom

The fact that you went out of your way to make this for everyone...

どうもありがとうございまず!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanParent

Thank you, very helpful! You're just missing ひくい - low


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anonk1

Whats the different between tonari and yoko?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaelahNoori

Tonari (隣): "next to", "next door", "neighboring". Used to refer to the nearest object of the same type, regardless of whether the actual distance is near or far.

Yoko (横): Things that are right next to each other, regardless of type.

Soba (側): "around" or "close by" in distance, not necessarily next to each other. Can only be used for physical position.

Chikaku (近く) or Chikai (近い, adj. form): "near by" but not literally, unlike soba.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonclay

Does nagai work for physical length too? Or is it just temporal/metaphorical


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronRoy9

It works for both. For example, you can say 彼女の髪は長い。 For her hair is long.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanSpau4

So yes for "ashi ga nagai desu ne" or "(your, her, etc.) legs are long aren't they. (believe it or not, you will hear this quite often in Japan). nagai can be used for physical attributes, but height is segatakai (takai = tall).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lindilme1

A little long for... What exactly? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlannaD396

As in too many pages. It takes too long to read it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FMAiscool

This whole time I was thinking the book itself has a long length, but I suppose that's possible as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanGamboa4

"a little long" seems an weird way to put things. Is it normal in Japanese to say something is "a little long" (as well as this terms are somehow contradictory to each other)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetlin

ちょっと can be translated like "slightly" or something similar too. If you're asking about the English construction "a little long" where "little" and "long" seem opposite, this sounds very normal in English. You can also say things like "This chair is a little big" or "a little small".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/afmohdno

Quite long should be fine though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeGompertz

'Quite' can mean opposite things depending on the variety of English. Eg: "It is long." "Quite." means it's very long.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HierophantWeen

Note: "chotto" is also sometimes used as "very". It depends on how you say it and based on the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leliel5

明日はちょっといそがしいです。would be a polite(ish?) way of saying that i'm too busy tomorrow for whatever it is you suggested.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelDres1

The same way it would be used in english "That's a little much" means "youve overdone it"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidKames

Yes, but that still does not mean "very"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Agreed. ちょっと never literally means "very", though it's often used by Japanese people to express discomfort/dissatisfaction without being overtly rude. Sometimes they won't even include the adjective, simply stating 「それはちょっと…」and trailing off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthmZabala

彼女の本はちょっと長いです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mancadu

In 彼女の本, does the phrase refer to a book that a woman happens to own, or does it refer to a book that the woman authors? I'm guessing the former, but then how would one say the latter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy_Zgierski

This girl's book is a bit long?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelstar.S2

"her book is kind of long" should work, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"Kind of" is a bit too vague a translation; it could mean a little or a significant amount.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Book is vs books are... Hrm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Either should work, as long as the subject and verb match.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Netsrak69

shouldn't "Her book is quite long." actually be a reasonable answer, in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"Quite" means something different from "a little/a bit".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leliel5

That actually depends what the context is.. Unfortunately in these exercises the the context is missing. It's certainly not impossible for it to mean that, but a more common translation would be the expected one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterWatanabe

Plural answer "her books are a little long" should also be accepted. It is a more usual thing to say and the sentence doesn't provide enough information to rule out that this is a general statement about her books.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NgYeowChon2

what is different between 少し , ちょっと,ちいさい? any sentences different use? or same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellHip

I may get this wrong but is "かのじょ" also means girlfriend?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellHip

I keep affiliating かのじょ with girlfriend. How do you say girlfriend in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/69wQcO

Yo duo added sliding transitions

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