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  5. "It is not short."

"It is not short."

Translation:短くないです。

June 22, 2017

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandyn_Davis

I wonder what he's talking about...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noritamayo

Obviously a pen-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

-is

and yours, to be precise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noritamayo

oh god.. how did you know??! Stalkerさんきもっっ。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeqiHan

短くないです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edikan2

Why isn't it "I'm not short"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyrisath

In Japanese, the subject (the person/thing performing the verb) is often left unspoken, and only understood from context. The sentence above doesn't actually contain a Japanese word for "I" or even for "it" - basically all it literally says is "is/are not short," which sounds incomplete in English but is pretty normal in Japanese. "It" is used in the translation because English demands a subject, and it's pretty much the closest you can get to the implied, context-dependent subject in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boo913

That still doesn't explain why the implied subject isn't the speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

みじかい is not used to refer to people's height in Japanese. You'd use 背が低い (せがひくい) to refer to a person as short instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Right, that's how duo has been doing things up to now .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean-LoupR

What's the difference between みじかい and みじかく? Is it the fact that one is a negative sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzatHaidov

I think it's the adverb form by adding -ku, which is, again from what I've gathered, is required when constructing the negative with -nai.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celcius_01

That's what he said.

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