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"Have you been to foreign countries?"

Translation:外国に行ったことがありますか?

1 year ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Michel160937

What does koto mean in this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
Keith_APP
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The thing. Literally, Does this thing (that you went to a foreign country) exist? Meaning Have you ever been to any foreign country?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airzae
airzae
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"Have you been to a foreign country" is more accurate since the current sentence in english means "have you been to (multiple) foreign countries"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
V2Blast
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Since it's not specified in the Japanese sentence, it could be either singular or plural.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
Keith_APP
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If I have been to 1 foreign country only, I should answer "No, I haven't."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamomNF
RamomNF
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It is like "have you ever had the experience of been in a foreign country" or just "have you ever been in a foreign country", but this form usually isn't used for daylife or commonplace situations.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandyn_Davis

Instead of "ni" shouldn't it have been "e"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruthenium44

に and へ are virtually interchangeable, you can use either

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airzae
airzae
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No, へ would emphasize the direction, which doesn't really make much sense when used with something like 'foreign countries'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/6thmonth
6thmonth
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but to me, 外国へ行ったことがありますか sounds more like: Have you ever been on your way to foreign countries.

The following quote is from http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/verbparticles (July, 28. 2017) " The primary difference between the 「に」 and 「へ」 particle is that 「に」 goes to a target as the final, intended destination (both physical or abstract). The 「へ」 particle, on the other hand, is used to express the fact that one is setting out towards the direction of the target. As a result, it is only used with directional motion verbs. It also does not guarantee whether the target is the final intended destination, only that one is heading towards that direction."

That's why I would prefer to use に rather than へ in this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
Keith_APP
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“Have you ever been on your way to foreign countries.” seems a bit of a strange question to me. But I would leave it to a native for opinion.

Tae Kim ! Although I agree with most of his explanation about へ, some points worth a closer look. Firstly it is a bit arbitrary to say へ is ONLY used with directional motion verbs. It is pretty easy to find exceptions, e.g.

お医者になることへ努力します。

I work hard to become a doctor.

Secondly へ does talk about only the direction, but in my opinion it has very limited implication, if any, that the destination is elsewhere. Compare with To and Towards, the distance between に and へ is smaller. If someone says "I go towards Tokyo", I would feel that his destination is probably not Tokyo but somewhere in between, or otherwise he would have said "I go to Tokyo". 東京に行きます and 東京へ行きます would seem to me just 2 different fashions of saying the same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
Keith_APP
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Perhaps only when talking about a destination

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianWill829460

I have heard that "(h)e" is used as "to go" but "ni" implies that you go there with some intention. I'm sure "ni" is far more common. Maybe because there's always something you're going to be doing on the other end!

11 months ago