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  5. "ごはんが大好きです。"

"ごはんが大好きです。"

Translation:I love rice.

June 22, 2017

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanicekSuh

In korean, we say "밥", meaning Rice, but also refer to it as "meal". Might be the same with Chinese, and obviously Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemiMurgos

Yes, japanese also uses the same word for rice and a meal, given their high respect towards rice (as a life-saving and giving source of food). I guess some other germanic languages also have hints in their words toward grains (see: german Mahlzeit - you "mahl" (grind) flour. That might be an exaggeration, though.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xyvyrianeth

Well, I mean, rice is the most consumed food on the planet..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

The roots for "Mahl" and "mahlen" have different Old High German roots, according to Wiktionary.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Mahl#German

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mahlen#German


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenglucia

In Chinese, rice is 米, while meal is 飯, and 米飯 is cooked rice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

飯 can also mean "meal" in Chinese :) like 吃飯


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiKomprenasVin

Not sure if it's relevant, but the root of the word "to eat" in Tagalog (Philippines) is "kain", "to eat" is "kainin" and "rice" is "kanin". So essentially, "kainin" likely morphed into "kanin", so they share the same root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatInOsaka

Yes it is, gohan is similar to the use of bap; asa-gohan, hiru-gohan, ban-gohan all means breakfast, lunch, and dinner! I learned a few words and understand a lot of the Hangul, after I learn Japanese, I'll learn more Korean! I lived there for 4 months!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chen57484

yes, in Chinese, the same . when we refer to rice ,specifically attach the character 米 in front of 饭(飯). in fact , solely 米 also means rice . in Japanese it can be 白ご飯, in Chinese, 白饭(steamed rice).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OxfordWang

Definitely the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candy580365

I like how "money" is in one of the options.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

Isn't ご飯 also used for food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

I'd say meal (and use たべもの for "food"), but yes, they're the same word. That's because rice is historically such an important staple food that there wasn't much need for a distinction. Happens in other languages too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea320058

In a figurative sense it is. 食べもの is literally "food", while ご飯 is figuratively "meal" since rice is such a huge staple. It would kind of be like if English speakers referred to all meals as bread


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashley457984

Yeah, king of like Americans using the word pudding to refer to a specific food whilst also meaning desert.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alehkra

That's more of a British thing, I think. At least in the part of America I come from, (Idaho/Colorado), we exclusively use pudding to refer to a specific food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/retroade

that's a distinctly british phrase. takes me back to when i first read harry potter and thought everyone had an obsession with pudding!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suplauren

I think you mean British people using pudding as a general term for desserts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xhileno

I put "i really love rice" and got marked incorrect. How come?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

Probably "really love" would be more appropriate as a translation of とても大好き rather than just 大好き


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

I got the same for "really like", even though that's how I've often seen だいすき translated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatInOsaka

Reminder never use 犬好き on someone you barely know, even using 好き is really strong on someone you just meet and are dating in Japan. Never use 愛してる because it is the strongest way to state love, and should only be used in circumstances when your lived one is dying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularfanb0y

Daisuki - exaggerated. Aisheteru - comical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dot844345

I thought daisuki meant favorite.what's the right word for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

It is favourite but only when used as an adjective e.g. 私の大好きな食べ物は焼き鳥です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

お気に入り is quite a popular word for favourite I'd say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki-Mugetsu

That is surely the most useful sentence of this course. At least in my case !

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