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  5. "けさ、雨がふりました。"

"けさ、雨がふりました。"

Translation:It rained this morning.

June 22, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/echolox

Would like to get a tool tip just for the furimashita, not just for the whole phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"降ります" (furimasu) specifically refers to any kind of precipitation that is falling. You wouldn't in general use 降ります to mean anything other than that it is precipitating.

雨が降ります

Ame ga furimasu

It rains

雪が降ります

Yuki ga furimasu

It snows

("Furimashita" is the past tense.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rveenn

thank you! Your explanation was very clear :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJCatStack

From other comments, ふりました means 'fell.' So this sentence literally means 'This morning, rain fell.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel746428

furimasu means "to fall", at least is what some sites says. i tried to understand this way: rain/snow/etc falls. it makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sammie685230

What's wrong with the translation "it was raining this morning"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattMendoz4

It was raining this morning would be 今朝、雨が降っています。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

Remember the past tense should be used: 今朝、雨が降っていました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BastTee

The point is, I never heard Japanese people not using the ています form for the rain, because it is always something happening on a period of time. "雨が降っています" seems just right in daily like. Like in English "it rains" would feel awkward, at least for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poisonenvy

It's the difference between saying it rained (雨がふりました) vs it was raining (雨がふっていました).

Likewise "it rains" would be more like "In London, it rains" (ロンドンで雨がふります) , as opposed to "it's raining in London" (ロンドンで雨がふっています).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWbd3d

When it rains, it pours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

Agreed that the past continuous would be more appropriate here, but let's just give Duolingo the benefit of the doubt and say that it doesn't want to confuse beginners with this stuff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/genevievehahaha

今朝、雨が降りました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LipByakko

So ふりました means "it rained", right? So I have to say "it rained rain 「雨」?" This seems a bit too obvious/odd, can someone confirm this for me? Thx.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poisonenvy

ふりました is translated closer to falls. So ゆきをふりました would be snow fell, or in English, it snowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

Indeed. Mind the particles though: ゆき「が」ふりました. Snow is the subject here, not the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex425703

*ゆき not つき


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

Irony... thanks for spotting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/remeiil

Is ふりました specific to weather? ie would you talk about leaves or dust or even people skydiving using ふりました ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

Yes, pretty much. Leaves falling from trees or people from staircases and such, is 落ちる (おちる).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

I put "It rained in the morning" why is it wrong?!?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

朝 (asa) - morning

今朝 (kesa) - this morning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

"Rain fell this morning", should be correct. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimbo637922

Why is "This morning, it was rainy." Not correct? Does it want a verb instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Ame ga furimashita" as a set means "it rained". Your translation would be closer to "今朝、雨でした" (kesa, ame deshita).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMontrossiti

Kesa vs. Asa ? Kesa = Kono asa ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesusToni1

雨雨雨 雨雨雨

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