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  5. "おとといそぼがなくなりました。"

"おとといそぼがなくなりました。"

Translation:My grandmother passed away the day before yesterday.

June 22, 2017

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/janoliverc01

First a lot of people died, then the dog, then the grandfather, now the grandmother. There must be an epedemic!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steadwords

The owls seem to be doing well though. Almost suspiciously well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomatoCereal

They must've forgotten their daily Japanese lessons too many times     (゜ 口 ゜)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myrrawolf

dundunduuuuuh!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceForce

みんなが死にます.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Falcon198016

一昨日祖母亡くなりました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt522032

What is the difference between 死にました and なくなりました? Is なくなりました a softer way of saying someone died, where as 死にました is a bit more blunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Islacorn

yes its a softer way of saying it. なくなりました is like saying "passed away" in english and "死にました" is like say "died"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BreathlessTao

There are a lot of ways "to die" in Japanese, indeed, some of them are quite situational, many quite poetic or literary, so don't be surprised if you stumble into even more. And yes, for the most part they only differ in the "level of bluntness".

For example this one, 亡くなる, literally means "to turn into nothing" or "to become nothing". As an added bonus, it is another one of those expression that can also be used with the honorific prefix: お亡くなる.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natto591178

Typing all this feels like bad luck.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisterM2402

Sounds like ototoi soba is being split into ototo and isoba. May be a problem with the audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slash513421

What a sad story..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geronimo703758

The day before last should be accepted, reported it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferEp13

Oops I translated "a lot of grandmas passed away"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaya_Tsuya

Well yes a lot did pass away

.....because on each one of our

devices

A grandma then dies ._.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apopo12

why is everyone dying this week


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

The owl.... it's... it's collecting life insurance but... there's no incriminating evidence to find! Don't tell it I said this, I don't want to get sued for slander or worse, "pass away by natural occurrence"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielHarada

I misread おととい as おとうと, and was really confused why I would talk about my grandmother in such a roundabout fashion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack86353

Umm... it said I was incorrect for saying "my grandmother passed away day before yesterday." Looks like I am supposed to be improving my English Grammar at the same time, because apparently the answer should have been "my grandmother passed away THE day before yesterday."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James483647

the day before yestersay is two days ago. That should be an answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

You may (more or less) be talking about the same day, but they're not the same expressions. "The day before yesterday" is just one word in Japanese: 一昨日. "Two days ago" would be 二日前.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Ototoi is a Japanese noun that literally means the day before yesterday. If they wanted to say two days ago then they would say futsukakan mae (two days prior).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaya_Tsuya

Say your prayers,

It only gets worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WiseOwl1006

Death is everywhere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexolas

Holy kuso! It's just like Game of Thrones!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean1984Pengin

i just had one before this that was my grandmother died the day before yesterday, is it necessary to put both sentences in duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I'm confused - this sentence means my grandmother died the day before yesterday - the same sentence that you say you had previously - if this is the case then it is not a case of "both" - they are the same sentence. fyi some duo lessons pretty much repeat the same sentence over and over and over again so having the same sentence repeated over two lessons (if that's what you're saying) is actually preferable to lessons that repeat one sentence over and over, in my opinion anyway. At any rate - it's free! Enjoy learning! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean1984Pengin

yes i know they repeat stuff but it was the same sentence but instead of passed away they used the word died


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Gotcha! : ) I just did a few german lessons maybe yesterday that had the same sentence repeatd 2 or 3 times and also had the same sentence repeated but required you to translate it into English, or into German or write what you heard or choose the write words from a word bank - same lesson. arrrgghh. But free, so... ; )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean1984Pengin

:-) that is true you cant beat free at all .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean1984Pengin

cool i thought i was loosing my mind lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean1984Pengin

and in this one they used passed away, so basically the one before this said my grandmother died the day before yesterday and this one said my grandmother passed away the day before yesterday


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilNaey

duolingo bird kills everyone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AesusV

This lesson is DARK

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