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  5. "大学のおみせで、じょうぎをかいました。"

"大学のおみせで、じょうぎをかいました。"

Translation:I bought a ruler at the university store.

June 22, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasOrla2

Daigaku also means university, so that should work as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vcfvct

大学のお店で、定規を買いました 。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swifty567

'I brought a ruler at the university's store', didn't work!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shirch22

Should be 'bought' not 'brought' :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

I don't understand why the japanese sentence is split with a comma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ever2662

I'm intrigued by the use of a comma here. Anyone have some insight on how it's being used? I know it's not mandatory, but I'm guessing it functions to offset the で from the 定規, maybe, so that it's clear that the で is setting context for the buying (I bought it AT the store) rather than the ruler (I bought the ruler that is AT the store).

Thoughts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauraglot85

It's because it's a prepositional phrase. You're saying something like "At the university store, I bought a ruler."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

But I don't think similar lessons had those comma. Or maybe had and I just did not look for it.

Thought they were absolutely optional in japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synargy

There are quite a few questions that use a comma, and in most cases they are simulating a verbal pause which would replace the topic marker は.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/developedby

What is a university shop?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToadFish2

When i was in college we had a store on campus where we could buy supplies and text books.


[deactivated user]

    Yup. Always more expensive, too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

    A shop either owned by the university or situated in/near a university catering specifically for the students going to the said university. A university bookshop for example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulAlbert10

    It should be at an university store


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morvan82

    No, it is "a". The rule goes by sound, not spelling.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmEki

    "university" is considered to be pronounced with a consonant sound at the beginning in English. So "a university store" is correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexolas

    Yeah; it's pronounced /juːnɪˈvərsətiː/ ("yooniversatee"), with that /j/ ("y") consonant at the beginning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cpJM5

    I automatically wrote "college bookstore" because that's what we called it but was marked wrong :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
    • 2566

    Is the お obligatory here, or could you just say 大学の店?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve817862

    It is not obligatory. No one I know says it that way. Just 店. It is very humble and self-effacing, and usually feminine. You would only say it under certain circumstances, like if you are a salesman talking to a shopkeeper about his wonderful shop because you want him to stock your product.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-.owo.-

    pretty sure the お is just honorific.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NirmanDeka

    And i thought じょうぎmeans ruler as if my emperor.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

    Do you really think someone bought an emperor from a store? Or are you just being jocular?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

    When to use o? I don't believe Steve is correct, but maybe I'm wrong. Can someone enlighten me, I read o Was honorific.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

    You said you don't believe Steve is correct but yet you said you think it's honorific. That's contradicting. What Steve said is a good description of what 'honorific' means in Japanese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

    My mistake. I misread his post. Good point

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