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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Kiel oni diras...

Kiel oni diras "That's what she said!" en Esperanto? I have seen several versions, but which one would Steve Carell choose?

June 23, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

The first question should be "is this an international expression?" My hunch is that it is not. Know Your Meme has some interesting information - including a reference to an older expression with the same meaning "so said the actress to the bishop."

There's a certain level of subtlety and nuance when making an innuendo, not to mention a good amount of shared cultural experience. A literal translation might be something like "tiel sxi diris" or "tion diris sxi" - but try that on some people who aren't native English speakers and haven't grown up on Wayne's World and the cultural fallout and you're likely to hear "Momenton, pri kiu ni parolas?"

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/thats-what-she-said

Update: I just discussed this question with one of my students (I teach English and Esperanto online). He's a very advanced second-language speaker of English and had never heard of "that's what she said". He usually understands very well and very quickly, but it was difficult to get him to see the meaning here. My advice is not to try to say this in Esperanto. It's going to flop.

June 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdroege

As salivanto said, it doesn't work as a joke. If you want to state factually that THAT is what she said, just say it! Jokes are so often tied to culture that we don't realize how often they lose their meanings in translations.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

I just want to say it to people who are in on the joke, but thanks anyway...I'll figure things out myself. Have a nice day.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Why figure it out on your own? I answered it in my first comment.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Sorry, it just seemed like your thrust was don't try it and that was a conversation ender. I am glad the discussion continued. Thanks for being patient.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

My wife and I have started to learn Esperanto for the pure enjoyment of doing something together because we genuinely click and have been together for 25 years (even though we spend 24 hours a day with each other for the last 12 years with the exception of about 3 weeks because of a family illness). We like hanging out together and we have lots of cultural references and private jokes that we say to each other. We have begun to say things like, "mia malbono" instead of saying "my bad". We like saying, "Ili diras ke, la tempo estas la fajro en kiu ni brulas" because it is a line from the Delmore Schwartz poem that was used in a Star Trek film. (I didn't translate it, I merely found it.) When I figure out how to say "don't cut the muffin", she is going to find it hilarious and not one other person I would say that to would understand. It would take too long to explain that one. I do expect I will say things to people who are not in the loop, but this is not for that purpose. But this did provide the impetus for me to look up how to say "Malseca litkovrilo" which I am hoping means "wet blanket". I did that because I could not figure out "party pooper" "buzzkill" or "spoilsport" I'll figure those out for myself too. And yes, I realize "wet blanket" is an idiom.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

malseka = wet

Search YouTube for : german party pooper -- or -- Jennifer is a party pooper

"muffin" is a hard word to translate because it's a national food item. National food items don't have names in the international language. I say "taspano".

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveRutan

Ooh! 'Taspano' . Bonega vorto!

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Great stuff! Thanks Salivanto! I do think it is worth trying to translate these things. Some of the fun of learning a new language can be had in learning how to swear, telling jokes, writing poetry, singing Christmas carols, etc. Certainly I appreciate your previous point about things that are vernacular, and I agree it is difficult, but worth trying. I am waiting for my copy of "The Hobbit" because I am curious how they translated Gollum saying "What has it got in its pocketses?" If nobody tried to translate these difficult things, we wouldn't have the translation of "The Hobbit"

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Or eleventy-first.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

I talked to the local library and there are 2 libraries that have copies of "La Hobito, aux , Tien kaj Reen" and both are about 1500 miles away from me, but I have an inter-library loan request to hopefully get a peek at it before I invest in my own copy.

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

The only reason I started this thread is because I saw someone say "Tio kio sxi diras" on a discussion of a exercise in Duolingo and I got the joke...although I thought it should be "Tio kio sxi diris." I just wanted to get someone else's translation.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Did I read above that you have been speaking Esperanto for 25 years?

  • That is what she said = Tion sxi diris.
  • or ... tio estas tio, kion sxi diris.

You could also say - tiel sxi diris. (She said thus.)

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Thanks Salivanto. I meant we have been together together for 25 years. I have only been speaking Esperanto for 4 weeks. So if a conversation went: q: Is she coming soon? a: She said she was coming at noon. q: Are you sure? a: That's what she said. Which of those options you listed would fit that last conversation? I appreciate your time. Thanks for the help.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Haha. Yes. That makes a difference. My wife and I will have been together 25 years by the end of the summer. 20 of those years have had Esperanto in them.

As for which one I would use in that context... tion sxi diris.

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Fantastic! You rock! Vi estas mojosa.

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

Salivanto may know this, but this is for everyone who has input. I am wondering if there is an onomatopoeia equivalent of "knock" in order to do a knock knock joke.

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Frap frap

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdroege

Frap, frap! Envenu! I don't think it is actually very funny ...

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveRutan

It's a shame. A few years ago i was given a small collection of knock knock jokes in Esperanto. I lost them when that computer suddenly died. I remember they depended on turns of phrase, suct as advo(kato) and the like. I do have one though that would work in any language, perhaps with a little adaptation.

Frap, frap.

Kiu estas?

Interrompema bovino.

Interrom-

MUUU!

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bricxjo

My wife loved that one, thanks!

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveRutan

In English, that joke is my neice's favorite, second only to the Interrupting sloth...

Frap, frap.

Kiu estas?

Interrompema bradipo.

Interrompema bradipo, kiu?

(la bradipo malrapidege movas sian manon por tuŝi la aliulon per la fingro...)

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CreedeLambard

I just texted that to my sister, who is the queen of dumb silly jokes. Thanks!

June 26, 2017
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