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  5. "わたしの友だちはとけいのかいしゃにつとめています。"

"わたしの友だちはとけいのかいしゃにつとめています。"

Translation:My friend is working at a clock company.

June 23, 2017

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherubl

Please....give us kanji....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

"私(わたし)の 友達(ともだち)は 時計(とけい)の 会社(かいしゃ)に 勤(つと)めています。 "

Please... kanji....to you...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wise-Wolf-Shiro

そらさん、ありがとうございました ^ ^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Thanks!

I am sorry when I am mistaken.(^∇^);


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

Why passed tense "... mashita"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicolajade95

I think this is often used when leaving shops etc - it's more like "thanks for that!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhyaisme

To be more precise and accurate, you say ありがとうございます to those who are still doing something for you. You say ありがとうございました to those who had completed their (good) deed for you.

Same thing with お疲れ様です (おつかれさまです) "thank you for your hard work", you say that to someone who's still doing the job and you appreciate the work s/he's doing; for example, you say this to a co-worker who has to stay overtime when you're about to depart home from the office. You say お疲れ様でした (おつかれさまでした) "thank you for your hard work" to someone who already did the deed; for example, a wife would tell her husband this after she welcomes him home, or you would tell this your co-worker that the project you did with him was done successfully.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuOfOwari22

Right! This was difficult to read XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

In kanji it's even more difficult though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian_Jean

same, duolingo doesn't really take the time to teach a lot of kanji, so reading in hiragana (or even katakana) works best for me at the moment


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roshihara

For me its actually more difficult witout kanji. Im willing to learn kanji, if only duolingo would bother actually teach me with kanji. There needs ro be some kind of opt in for people that actually desire ro have kanji for the people that are willing to learn it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy969082

I said, "works for" instead of "works at" so I get it wrong lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Should be accepted. Report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deepfriedmcrib

The hardest part for me was figuring out that the object did not belong to the clock.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silver57023

While "no" is usually used to denote possession, here it is used describe the type of company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Banner223

I used 'friends' in plural, but it didn't get accepted. Is there a way to differentiate between 'friends' and 'friend' in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesussushi

No there's no difference it depends on the context that should have been accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalconFlurry

友達たち would be plural, wouldn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2043

How would one say: "My friend is working on a company clock"? As in, she is fixing a clock that belongs to the company?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silver57023

(sorry, can't type in hiragana and kanji on this phone)

But if I'm not wrong it should be "watashi no tomodachi wa kaisha no tokei wo shuurishimasu" -> my friend repairs the company's clock


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2043

So, the "main" difference from the course sentence is:

"tokei no kaisha" ~ "company of clock"

and

"kaisha no tokei" ~ "clock of company"

right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silver57023

Yes. The subject before the "no" will indicate the possessor or in this case describe the type of company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yufie_nanaroku

I noticed Duo used either に or で as place particle for つとめて. Which one is more common? ("kaisha ni tsutomete" or "kaisha de tsutomete"?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2572

What's the difference between 「働く」 and「 勤める」?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenFresoli

My understanding is 働く is just like 'work' in english but 勤める is like working under someone/something or working as some job


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DawnChesbr

Isn't it better to use 働きます rather than 務めます. I got the impression that 務めます "I serve" was used for civil servants, like government workers; whereas 働きます is more generic "I work"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

'(company name) に勤めています。' is natural phrase as 'I am working at (company name)'. You can use it as it is.

There are several kanji of ’つとめる’. Each kanji are a bit different.

The kanji what you write is a bit different from I write.

http://www3.u-toyama.ac.jp/niho/kanjien/iji_dokun_v/tutomeru.html

But you have known very well much kanji. awesome! :O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

Could this also mean "my friendS"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilygaze

Can't decide what this sentence sounds like more, a setup for a joke or a punchline to one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristophP89013

"my friend works for a watch company" should be correct! There's no "ni" here come on translations are not literal!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

つとめる??? I thought "to work" is はたらきます or whatever its base form is...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmEki

It's unfortunate that you can't report that your answer should have been accepted on listening exercises (at least on PC)... A lot of them don't accept kanji answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bernat504669

I have a general question. Don't japanese people get confused with so much stuff before the verb? In this case for example, I feel like you're just saying a lot of stuff that's piling up to finally explode when you say the verb. And when you get to it you don't remember half of the things that had relation with the verb, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

I mistakenly got the other word while doing in haste. Duo corrected me by suggesting watch company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RelakS2

Holy cow! Even children books have at least spaces between words here and there! This looks like a hiragana soup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/compujo

Sounds like they're really putting in the hours


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eckhazar

This one was way to tricky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomTheMystik

Well it's about time...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaHumourless

"my friend is working at a clock firm" was rejected. "Firm" is another word for "company", so I reported it. So there.

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