1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "おとといそぼがしにました。"

"おとといそぼがしにました。"

Translation:My grandmother died the day before yesterday.

June 23, 2017

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/envylol

Stop killing people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l0mel0rd

Must've been that serial killer owl killing grandparents and dogs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinhhoainam998

Just finished sentence "my granddad is one hundred" :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

一昨日祖母が死にました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Warnerau

OMAE WA MOU SHINDEIRU!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Picmov

Kenshirooo!!! :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse319162

First the hat dog, then a lot of people, and now both of my grandparents? Sounds suspicious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G-M2
  • 245

Blame it on the owls. There seems to be one of them around whenever someone dies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DimyPour

Fun fact: Greeks believed visited by an owl foreshadowed death


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THELANGUAGEL0VER

I'm half-Greek, and I can confirm that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KurenaiRozu

So depressing T-T


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBanci

how can one tell the difference if one is talking about soba noodles and grandmother?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

I think it’s "sobo" (??)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sitak

We are confusing ba ば and bo ぼ ^^.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zuvian

I thought it was soba too. it's sobo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

私も. I think the confusion comes from the other word for grandmother. お祖母さん/おばあさん->祖母/そぼ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante.I.

This is a weirdly common mistake. I did it too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

The same way i can tell you're talking about the difference between two concepts and not trying to explain grammar to a difference engine or the concept of 3-2


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesewesen

The pronounciation is a bit weird


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arielauehara

Ok so instead of saying "died" or "しぬ" say "passed away" or " なくなりました"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse319162

“To die” is しぬ, which can be used but is a little bit impolite. The past tense of that is しにましあた. More polite (and usually used when talking about somebody that you liked dying is the verb なくなる, which means something along the lines of “to pass away”. The past tense of that is なくなりました. The sentence “そぼがしにました” would be rarely used, considering the politeness level most people use when talking about their grandparents. Overall, use both しぬ and なくなる (しにました and なくなりました in the past tense) but know when to use each one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

*しにました in your second sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tricinus

So uh... Is this the death lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sadovnikovss

Should't ‘granny’ be accepted as an equivalent of ‘grandmother’ here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rat.Waren

It seems that sobo and sofu are more humbly/polite. However baba or jiji are more informal, like granny or grandpa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Please don't call your grandmother or grandfather "baba" or "jiji" because long vowels matter!! "Baaba" and "jiiji".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naxbulk

My grandmother actually died a few weeks ago. Hitting close to home here Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanQuitDoulingo

Is it me or is this lession a bit grim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSnow20

"i think ill practice some Nihongo to take my mind off the funera.... why!" :.(.. :.(.. :.(..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElTibs

So it has to be "MY grandma died the day before yesterday." and not just "Grandma died the day before yesterday." ? Is this a culture thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

I think the course creators wanted you to be aware that you use different words for talking about someone else's grandmother and talking about your own. You would not use "sobo" to refer to someone else's grandmother, or obaasan to refer to your own. (Although you might call your grandmother directly "obaasan" or alternatively "obaachan.") You use "humble" words for your family members, and more "polite" terms indicating a more elevated status for others' family members. It's good to be aware of this from the start.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathieuSau7

This module is grim af.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

あれは悲しい日だった


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoratioPNelson

Man this lesson got grim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura258217

So much death in this lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medusa747

Filthy Frank taught me to say "おととい, そばはしんだ." I think I'll stick with Grandma wa shinda, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASleepingRock

Not the buckwheat noodles!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

At least she lived to 101.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelvin401862

I can see my grandmother sitting out on the front porch of heaven, petting hat dog on his little head. She may even be wearing a hat herself.

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.