"Let's eat!"

Translation:いただきます。

6/23/2017, 2:17:23 PM

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Udrian

I do not really think いただきます is a good translation for Let's eat. But it's hard to translate, what would you translate it to?

6/24/2017, 5:13:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/THason

Let's eat: tabemashou. Itadakimasu is just a quick show of gratitude (to any cosmic force that wants to listen) before you start to eat.

6/27/2017, 12:08:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/animatrix1490

Like in movies when, instead of saying a blessing on the food, they just say the word "Grace" and then dig in?

6/30/2017, 5:44:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/HkumiGumi

No, it's just thanking someone who made the meals to be polite.

9/9/2017, 6:50:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/FelipeKail.an

Once a time, a person told me: "If in doubt, be polite". Polishness is the key for Japanese.

9/9/2017, 4:28:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Swagyon

"Polishness is the key for Japanese" dont mean to offend, i just find that typo hilarious

1/9/2018, 2:21:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HkumiGumi

You've got a point there, but I guess this is just one of the manners in Japan, and same goes for other Eastern Countries too.

9/9/2017, 4:57:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tigermink

I have to learn Polish now?

3/18/2019, 3:40:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryanstrohl
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W1q

8/21/2017, 9:05:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DemonFace

I guess it's like "bon apetit".

10/30/2017, 12:37:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jogerj
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no

1/8/2018, 11:48:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alyeku
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Tabemasu

10/4/2017, 11:14:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Marthin147531

It いただきましょう a word?

7/13/2017, 2:20:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanDale3
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I don't think so. At any rate, いただきます doesn't necessarily literally mean "Let's eat," it's more a stock phrase used right before you start eating.

7/24/2017, 3:09:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

You're absolutely right about いただきます, but I just wanted to point out that いただきましょう is a word in Japanese too.

Both words stem from 頂く(いただく), which is a 謙譲語 (けんじょうご) or "humble language" verb, meaning "to receive" or "to accept".

So, いただきます literally means "to humbly receive/accept", and is also frequently used in situations other than before one starts eating (where the implication is "I will humbly receive this food"). On the other hand, いただきましょう means "let's humbly receive/accept", but it isn't used as often as いただきます around meals, since the hortative here implies you are waiting for consent from the listener.

9/28/2017, 11:24:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/hoosuu
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The better translation would be 'Thank you for the meal.' before starting to eat. In the word it also contains the meaning 'I will eat with gratitude.'

10/27/2017, 8:19:29 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

I kind of disagree. Ignoring what you already know about いただきます and the Japanese culture surrounding it, "Thank you for the meal" sounds more like something one would say after eating. It's not necessarily an incorrect translation, but not necessarily any better either.

Further, the word いただきます only means "to receive" or "to accept". There is nothing in the word itself that contains "I will eat with gratitude"; that comes from cultural knowledge and context. For example: 拝見させていただきます (はいけんさせていただきます) is a very formal phrase meaning "Allow me to have a look". Nothing to do with eating or gratitude.

11/16/2017, 10:25:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jogerj
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いただきます is used to express gratitude for the food, for the person who's prepared the food (from farming, fishing, cooking, serving), gratitude for the life the food has lived (if it's meat), and the chance to enjoy the meal.

食べましょう = "let's eat!" in context to invite someone to eat (together)

1/8/2018, 11:46:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AndersOliv1

When you say itadakimasu. You are speaking to the food.

7/22/2017, 1:33:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/HoroTanuki

"You will now perish to feed me"

11/13/2017, 6:26:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Totoro_2021

I heard いただきます described as an equivalent (though not a direct translation) for "thank you for the food". It's a way of showing that you're grateful for the meal.

4/9/2018, 4:20:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChulsooYu

いただきます means thank you for the meal. or thank you for the food. but before eating.

11/23/2017, 12:33:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/brunernw

Eat your hamburgers, Apollo

12/31/2017, 7:45:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyNihongo

I didn't put the です and got it wrong.. Not sure why that needed to be on the end

3/4/2018, 3:55:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

There shouldn't be a ですin this sentence at all.

です means "is/am/are" and can't be used after other main verbs, such as いただきます (which is the suggested answer for this exercise) or 食べましょう (which is an alternative answer for this exercise, though this grammar structure has yet to be introduced in the course).

3/11/2018, 11:55:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

です does not mean this. It's a purely English interpretation. If you check a Japanese version of grammar, it nowhere draws a parallel between です and a verb stating existence.

3/14/2019, 2:49:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/THason

Hm.. straying off-topic here, as ですisn't used in this sentence, but it's not wrong to say that です "means is/am/are". It's not an interpretation, it's the nearest translation: です is a copula, and in Japanese there are several, in English the copula is 'to be' - and 'is/am/are' == to be. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copula_(linguistics)

3/14/2019, 2:58:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

You think it means that, because you speak English, and this is how noun and adjective Japanese predicates are naturally translated for you. If something is translated in a particular way to your language, it doesn't necessarily mean it has that meaning. Like for example I would have translated "I have a pen" to my native language as "a pen is with me". It doesn't mean "to be" in my native language means "to have". Does it make sense? Saying that です means "to be" sets a false parallel stemming from the English interpretation of the Japanese language.

3/14/2019, 3:26:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/THason

No, you misunderstand a little, I think. です is a copula[1], and that's the whole point. This has a specific meaning. To the extent that any sentence can be translated from one language to another, you have to use the equivalent in the other language - if there is one. And the use of a copula is such a case. In situations where です is used in Japanese you'll end up with a variant of 'to be' in English (as the only 'true' English copula). That does not mean that 'to be' always translates to です in Japanese - you would use e.g. あります in other cases where 'is' would still be used in English.

[1] です isn't always used as a necessary copula, sometimes it's only added for politeness. You would still use 'is' in English, with or without です (おいしい vs おいしい です, for example)

(it's similar with e.g. Romance languages, where, for example, both "è" and "sta" in Italian have to be translated to 'is' in English - that doesn't mean that 'is' can always be translated to, say, 'sta'. You still have to call it a 'translation' though, not an interpretation.

The short of the above would be that です does mean 'to be' (in its multiple variations), (except where です isn't actually needed, grammatically, re. politeness), but 'to be' does not universally mean 'です'.

3/14/2019, 3:54:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

I didn't misunderstand anything. I know exactly what I am talking about. And I know what copula is. It seems like you misunderstood my message. Ask several Japanese native speakers who teach Japanese. They will tell you, that in no way です means "to be". It's just your English brain sets a false parallel.

3/14/2019, 4:06:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/THason

I can only assume that you are suggesting that です is not a copula (ignoring the exception cases). Well, my Japanese dictionary does define ですas a copula. And it's very hard to argue that it doesn't function as a copula, in the vast majority of sentences where it's used, so it's hard to disagree with the dictionary.

Edit: And also: www.imabi.net/thecopulaii.htm

3/14/2019, 4:12:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

I am not suggesting です is not a copula. You obviously are not reading my messages before replying. If it is translated as "to be", it doesn't mean its literal meaning is "to be". It's your pre-wired brain interpretation. Let me repeat again: check Japanese grammar written in Japanese for Japanese, ask native speakers. です DOES NOT mean "to be".

3/14/2019, 4:43:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

I don't know where all the animosity in this thread came from (and I read all the comments between you and @THason), but I think you'll find that my "purely English interpretation" is fairly standard for English learners which is what you should expect in Duolingo's Japanese course targeted at English speakers.

Also, if you check my original comment, it nowhere draws a parallel between です and stating existence either. You "interpreted" is/am/are as being the verb "to be", which can be used to state existence, but these words are used in many cases with the implication of equivalence, not existence.

3/14/2019, 10:29:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

I didn't comment on your original post. I commented on this: "です means "is/am/are"". It's wrong. It doesn't mean that. Neither in the meaning of existence nor in the meaning of equivalency. It is translated this way, but it doesn't mean that. It's not uncommon when a translation doesn't follow the literal meaning. By trying to enforce it you are giving the learners a false equivalency and in fact impeding their progress. It's not my opinion btw. It's Eleanor Harz Jorden. It's especially important BECAUSE the course is for English speaking people, since they easily fall into the trap of thinking that "です means "is/am/are"". It doesn't.

3/15/2019, 12:28:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/THason

(just for the record - no animosity was intended or perceived from my side - it's just a discussion, after all)

If you describe です (or だ) as state-of-being (re. Tae Kim), instead of just 'to be', would it be more in line with your thinking?

In any case, as it's a cupola - if you want to translate sentences using it to other languages which also use the cupola, you'll end up with a variant of 'be', as 'to be' is not just a cupola in English, it's the cupola. There's only one. As for the example, I can't agree that "to a beginner, s/he will always think that きょうとです means “this is Kyoto”. " It just says 'Kyoto desu'. Kyoto state-of-being, if you wish. You need the context to understand it, which is one of the first things you have to learn when studying Japanese. Notice how all your other possible translations you suggest also use 'is'. There's just no way to avoid it. It's true that the nuances of ですis wider than just that, but that goes for a lot of translations - had there been just a one-to-one mapping from one to another then there are no real differences between languages. In short, I don't agree that saying that です means 'to be' is a disaster for learning. Although 'state-of-being' may be better.

However, to get a little bit back on topic, the error (IMO) that Duolingo (and not only in this exercise) does is to imply that いただきます means "Let's eat". It doesn't, and it's not even necessary as a suggested translation. There's a Kanji involved, thus you can actually talk about an actual meaning, and if you learn the real meaning of いただきます you will immediately understand what it means when the taxi driver uses it when talking to you after the ride. And not in the baffling sense that he's suggesting that you both should have a snack at the nearest sushi bar.

3/15/2019, 2:15:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Ok, what does です mean then? How would you explain it to an English speaker who doesn't have a thorough grasp of linguistics (I had to google Eleanor Harz Jorden)? Because to me, "It is translated this way, but it doesn't mean that" seems needlessly pedantic.

3/15/2019, 6:56:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

Translation not following the literal meaning is a very common and basic thing when you study a foreign language. For example, «у меня есть карандаш» is translated “I have a pencil”. It doesn't mean that «есть» means “to have”, it in fact means “to be”. Make sense? Going back to Japanese, if you imprint this weird knowledge about です to a beginner, s/he will always think that きょうとです means “this is Kyoto”. While it can mean “he is in Kyoto” or “he is from Kyoto”. It's just a mean to form a nominal or adjectival predicate in the distal style. That's it, this is its meaning. Once again, if you don't believe me, ask native speakers what です means. I have done this exercise, when I started.

3/15/2019, 7:38:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/percuriosus

if you want to translate sentences ... you'll end up with a variant of 'be'

Yes, the translation doesn't follow the meaning. I have said it like 10 times already.

I can't agree that "to a beginner, s/he will always think that きょうとです means “this is Kyoto”.

This is actually becoming ridiculous. On what basis you disagree? You teach Japanese? You are a linguist? How many students taught by you speak fluent Japanese? What I said is not my opinion, it's an opinion of linguists that teach Japanese in Universities for decades, among them are actual native speakers. They all unanimously say that です doesn't mean "to be". Its meaning is to form a distal style nominal and adjectival predicates. That's it.

Notice how all your other possible translations you suggest also use 'is'.

Yep, I noticed. Eleventh time. If something is translated in a particular way, it's not necessarily its literal meaning. Should I give the example the third time? I am patient, I can repeat.

3/15/2019, 4:00:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecil164832

It rejected "Jyaa itadakimas." Wouldn't that be a better translation? "Let's eat" sounds like someone being informal rather than thanking mom for bringing out the meal.

3/24/2018, 10:10:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

じゃあ is simply an interjection; it doesn't necessarily have any effect on the formailty of the sentence. Duo would prefer that you learn じゃあ = "well then", which isn't a terrible translation of it.

To me, "let's eat" sounds more like 食べよう anyway, but I understand the predicament Duo have put themselves in with trying to teach such idiomatic phrases.

4/9/2018, 5:17:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vA7T3
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I knew that they were looking for いただきます, but I didn't like that answer, so I answered 食べましょう instead, and got it right.

5/25/2018, 7:53:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jennifermar505

I think its whats said in FF15 when you get some food for the guys. I will take it as "lets eat" while i learn more to make my own assumption, but im guessing its probably the more commonly used phrase, so its provided as a preferable way to say something relating to the situation maybe. Just my humble OP, but putting everything in the language you are learning does help with exposure. Have a good one all.

3/12/2019, 11:43:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Raleti

I peha

11/18/2017, 6:06:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/zidemen
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6/3/2018, 12:24:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/korra76
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It is the Japanese way to say enjoi. The instead say "I eat"

9/4/2017, 4:24:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Gplor

I knew this word before from the anime

10/29/2017, 5:04:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranMudronja
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So it's basically "bon appetit"?

11/12/2017, 5:01:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jogerj
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no

1/8/2018, 11:42:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TJLlamo

Why the thibg on the end

6/23/2017, 2:17:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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what is thibg?

6/23/2017, 4:53:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/_kayla_h

I think they were referring to the "masu".

6/23/2017, 10:03:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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'Thibg' new word?

6/23/2017, 11:00:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Malazy100
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No, he made a mistake. He meant "thing"

6/24/2017, 4:58:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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ありがとう。thank you.

6/24/2017, 5:33:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacob45942

I think (read: i dont actually know what I'm talking about) masu is a verb, much like desu. Someone correct me, but i think the verb usually comes at the end.

7/26/2017, 12:01:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Giuseppe175091

ます is not a verb but the present plain form conjugation of a verb (ex:たべます means "eat" and はなします means "talk")

8/3/2017, 5:02:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryanstrohl
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Xaz Zzjnx7dr y6

8/21/2017, 9:15:34 PM
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