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  5. "男の子はお父さんに本を読んでとたのみました。"

"男の子はお父さんに本を読んでとたのみました。"

Translation:The boy asked his dad to read a book.

June 24, 2017

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxSmith630103

There should be an option to have it read slower, this rap god is killing me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ale.rodriguesx

Rap god...LOL. とたのみました is almost a tongue-twister to me at this speed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Pro tip: Don't focus on the individuals fonems, try to listen the words you already know. Your brain is not good at listening fonems, same as it is not good at the reading syllables and that's why you read the full word and not focus on them while reading.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Even if i say you a word you don't know in your idiom probably you will make mistakes breaking it down into syllables.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Huh? Is the word that you're looking for "phonemes"? Even so, I fail to see the connection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Takkun11

what's fonems?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

男の子はお父さんに本を読んでと頼みました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fadibanna

Can someone explain the use of と here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaLangosta

と is the particle used in Japanese for quotation. eg 田中さんは日本語がすきです言いました。--> Tanaka san said he likes Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

Is it ok to use です in this form here ? Shouldn't it be だ or even nothing ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryPeter98

You don't need です in this case because this sentence ends with a verb (読む) However if it ended with a noun you would need だ before the と__ For example 犬だと思う


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryPeter98

Oh oops yeah probably change the です to だ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akoakini

you can actually end up with です if you really want to say or repeat exactly what was said which ended in です。But the general rule is anatano ittatoori desu..あなたの言った通りです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LexEvans0

That makes so much sense thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wairanmax

I think. The boy asked his dad (about what)-(と) to read a book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelise_627

I'm not sure of what you are trying to say here.

男の子 は お父さん に「本 を 読んで」と たのみました。

Boy *tp his dad to book op read p asked

*tp = topic particle op = object marker particle p = particle (in this case と is kind of like a spoken end quote)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

"The boy asked his father to read books" not accepted. Here both singular and plural should be possible, and while not specified, plural is more natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haiw0n

Technically a more natural translation would be "The boy asked his father to read him a book/read a book to him" because the verb 頼む(たのむ) is more approximate to "to ask (to do)/to ask (a favour (of someone))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spookiyu

Would the "to him" be implied in Japanese? I thought the same, but what if it's a situation like, the boy really enjoyed this book and wants his father to read it too so they can share it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkyOwlKey

The use of に as opposed to を can be taken as implying "to him." If he just wanted his father to read a book it would use を.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

The "correct" version overlooks this interpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

It's what たのむ means - to ask someone to do something for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

A version with "him" was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haiw0n

But yeah, although I disagree with it being more natural, it should still be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

"The boy asked his father to read him a book." is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T33K3SS3LCH3N

I wonder, how would one say "I asked the boy to read a book to his father"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

I'm thinking it would have "わたし" in it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

お父さんに本を読み上げてあげるようにと少年に頼みました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

"De to" means what??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

読んで is the て-form of 読む (よむ). It's used here because the sentence is describing what the boy asks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

You got the form, but not the function: imperative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brettah31

Why not "The boy asked his father to read him a book"? It makes no sense for a boy to ask his father to read a book but not read it to him.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Both are possible, but the "him" version is more probable. IADOTC


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianWill829460

Can someone explain the "yonde" to me - I read it as to-read in the present progressive / continuous. Is that the only valid conjugation here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spaqin

I'm thinking this is the imperative form here, like in 読んでください (please read), not continuous like in 読んでいます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Red card! Equating the te-form with the progressive/continuous ignores its other functions.

I postpone translation further revisions, and posting to a more user-friendly part of Duolingo.

Note: 英語のte-formとは「~ている」という★形★。用途とsemanticsは別。

或るブログをアレンジさせていただきます。

故春彦先生※の分類で、日本の動詞は基本的には四つに分類されます。

※何を隠そう、先生のお葬式に参列させていただきました。

☆状態動詞。te-formを★持たない★動詞。⇒  「いる」「ある」の二つ。 注:「いている」をもつ方言もある。

☆継続動詞。te-formにすると、動作の★継続★を表わす。progressive (進行形)の動詞。食べるや読む、歩く、走る、書く等など。

☆瞬間動詞。te-formにすると、動作・状態が起こり、その結果が残っている★状態★を伝える動詞。つまり、立つや座る、折れる、結婚する、消える、点く、死ぬなど。

そして最後、 ☆形状動詞。te-formだけで用いられ、ある人、物の属性、特徴を示す。尖るや似る、聳える、曲がるなど。

但し、「曲がる」は例外で、二種類に分類されます。「この道は大きく右に曲がっている」はThe road bends to the right (lit. "Is bent")属性を、ケイタイを持ちながら、「いま、セブンイレブンのあるカーブを曲がっているところ」とも、progressive (進行形)にも使えます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristophP89013

The boy asked his father to read a book to him. Shouldn't be wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanabi3

”The boy asked his father to read him a book”  Why is this wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dieuadieu

This example seems quite strange to me, as I blow through this content. Hoping they'll add more advanced content soon, though i know this course has been a very long time coming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaLangosta

Agreed. Pretty unnatural sentence to me too. I didn't get the English translation correct despite having passed JLPT N2. Some of the sentences are definitely awkward and hard to translate if you know Japanese reasonably well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul.II

Obviously you don't know Japanese well. Or have a good feel for it.

Take it from someone who didn't care to take any JLPT and didn't have problems with the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Play nice, children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katharinalouise

In this sentence may also everything in plural These boys Their father Books


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I don't know about the others, but I don't think "these boys" are an acceptable translation. You need a この in front to write "this boy" as opposed to "the/a boy", so presumably there's a similar rule in place for the plural form of "this".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edikan2

Why に? Can someone please explain this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regina314969

my english is not that great, but it's like because he asked TO his father, the に = to i hope that make sense:'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

A corresponding English sentence is "The boy asked his father to read him a bedtime story." No TO necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Popinguj

You use this particle when you want to give something to someone or receive something from someone. The boy asked reading a book from his father. I hope this makes it more clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaleeya.k

What's the function of "とたの"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

It is ~とand たのみました. Check the comments above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferK183636

たのみました isn't asking, it seems more demanding or begging rather than asking. ききました would be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Nope. Although little kids can be very demanding, ビザを頼む is on the same level as English "order (in) a pizza."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoavtz

How would you say "the boy asked to read a book to his father"? I.e. more broadly, how do you differentiate between the NI being inside/outside the quotation denoted by TO?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

You can't differentiate in this case. Without the「」marks you cannot really say what's supposed to be in the quotation.

So, depending on the context, "the boy asked to read a book to his father" is a valid translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularfanb0y

I think using your father should be accepted too, by removing the his.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

I think you're right, without more context or a sentence that's more specific, we can't really say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Estel785882

How would you say "I asked the boy to read a book to his dad"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

Why does it have to be the text of last lecture and I think eben the same as the one before that.

I know the entire text by memory that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chibichan7

I used kanji to write "Tanomimashita" and it's not accepted. That's wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Then just keep reporting it until it's accepted. The contributors have to check every single report and add every single accepted translation to every single sentence manually, so with all the users sending in reports it most likely takes a very long time to get through them all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricPooley

How about, "a boy asked your father to read a book."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelheid_G

"The boy asked his father to read him a book" marked wrong.

Similar comment from 3 MONTHS AGO. Be better than this Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobbySatya

this example is extremely awkward because otousan is always supposed to refer to your own father


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

No. Only in the case of 父(ちち)it is limited to one's own father.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Ditto for 親父 and 父上 for you TV watchers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Not so. A recurring gag in many a Japanese movie involves a boyfriend addressing the girl's father as お父さん only to be immediately rebuked with a 君のお父さんじゃない. Not until the wedding. At the latest.

If you're invited into someone's home, it's perfectly normal to use お父さん・お母さん. That's their role, and they're proud of it.

Besides,

• Calling them "Mr. Tanaka" and "Mrs. Tanaka" gets old fast.

• Calling them by their given names is generally unthinkable.

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