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  5. "このせっけんをつかってください。"

"このせっけんをつかってください。"

Translation:Please use this soap.

June 25, 2017

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

この石鹸を使って下さい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Note however that 下さい/ください is generally written in kana only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorbynJP

Somebody must smell bad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PholaX

And he definitely has to take a shower immidiately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

Or they're leaving their short and curlies on your soap bar so you tell them to use this soap and not yours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benienhau

せっけん = 石鹸


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walgen

the japanese term is quite sensible.. stone/mineral + lye = soap. the chinese is a bit more obscure. fertilizer + oak seed. unless oak seeds were somehow used for soap processing back in the day. maybe someone here knows?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgrry
  • 1251

"肥" in "肥皂" also means "fat" in Chinese. "皂" refers to Gleditsia sinensis not oak seeds. Ancient folks used Gleditsia sinensis seedd for laundry and the fat is the main ingredient in the more "modern" product (soap) for laundry. I think both the Japanese and Chinese versions make perfect sense in their own ways.

ps. 肥 in chinese although translates to fertilizer, the real meaning is fat, as in fertilizing the crops to make them "fatter".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walgen

thank you. i had the wrong plant. i did know that 肥 means fat, but having the wrong plant screwed me up, i guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

i think it like a fat 七 is holding a white soap


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Real subtle, Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaeyoSS

Can someone tell me what's that small ''Tsu''?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEcobra11

The small tsu or chiisai tsu duplicates the next consonant and obviously changes pronounciation. せっけん: sekken in romaji. つかって: tsukatte. Other small letters you might find: a i ending kana(ki, shi, chi, ni, etc..) with a small y kana (ya, yu or yo) to form other sounds like きゃ(kya) or じゃ(ja), a (almost always because it might be a foreign word) katakana kana and a small vowel to form an otherwise inexisting sound with that consonant. For example: フォ: fo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloyd76445

Kono sekken wo tsukatte kudasai.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heyber_molano

These exercises without kanjis are ridiculous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

あなたは汚いですか


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinMerck1

Do people mostly use the kanji for sekken or kana? Jisho said the frequency of the kanji is over 2500

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