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  5. "今年はよくラーメンを食べました。"

"今年はよくラーメンを食べました。"

Translation:I often ate ramen this year.

June 25, 2017

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

今年 = ことし


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RockefellerSteel

kanji pronunciations confuse me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animexamera

you could try some kanji learning websites, i use wanikani! its the best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iseul-i-yeyo

I have an app called Kanji Studies that helps me a ton!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PreetamGhosh

Me too. I feel like it's the one of the best app out there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cratesofhippos

I didn't give Duolingo permission to use my diary entries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swallama

Must have been a college student


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllyciaChe

I put in frequently instead of often , am i wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

That should be fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derek003

Why is the official answer "ate a lot of" rather than "often ate"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

They have changed it to "I often ate ramen this year."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomPribyl1

I wrote this and it marked me wrong. I flagged it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

When the suggested translation is rejected, it's a technical glitch, as opposed to a missing translation.

Apparently what one can do is submit a bug report so Duolingo's technical staff can deal with it: . It's best to include a screenshot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickMarsto1

'Often' should be accepted for よく . If you wanted the answer ' a lot' why not use たくさん ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian365129

No wonder this year was a good year!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahANpg

Should have been "often" instead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiraji

It clearly means "This year, I ate ramen often." You didn't use たくさん here, if we're going to be literal. Sometimes I question why I keep going in this course when I'm correcting the questions more than they're teaching me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

The course in beta, so yes, that's exactly what you're doing, you're improving the course for when it is completed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SweetGoblin

"I have eaten a lot of ramen this year" is wrong. Can someone explain?


[deactivated user]

    Yeah I had the same answer and DL said "Nope, correct answer is 'He ate a lot of ramen this year'" which makes no sense since there is no "he" implied and thus "I" should be implied or at the very least not rejected.

    Only explanation is that the translation database has more holes than Swiss cheese. Literally speaking I suppose ました should translate to "I ate" rather than "I have eaten", but since we are talking about the current year, which by definition isn't over yet, "I have eaten..." seems the most logical English translation with an implied "...thus far." omitted at the end.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ice-Kagen

    But, shouldn't we use the present perfect, since the action happens "this year"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoGaste4

    No because we're using した which indicates past tense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ice-Kagen

    I understand that... But English and Japanese are two different languages that don't work the same way. My question was about English ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanicaBescae

    When you look back on a year, you usually use past tense, right? You don't say, "I have a lot of great trips" on New Year's Day. You say "I had a lot of great trips" to reminisce on that specific year. If you use present perfect, this is the new sentence: 今年はよくラーメンを食べます、which doesn't have a very smooth English translation: this year, I often eat ramen. Even when we interpret it, it has an entirely different meaning (the correct one remarking on the whole of the year, the new one remarking on your current progress).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flane4

    Ice-Kagen was suggesting using the present perfect, not the present. It is a form of past tense in English. So in your example it would instead be "I have had a lot of great trips". This feels like a much more natural way in English to talk about about a recent period that you are refering to with "this" and qualifying with "often". So for the above sentence, a more natural English translation would be "This year, I have often eaten a lot of ramen."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EarlDorianGrey

    You are by all means correct, grammatically. Unfortunately, when reminiscing, people tend to use "this" (year, month, week, day [today]) as a closed period in the past.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    Not necessarily. You could use either the simple past or the present perfect, depending on the context/intended meaning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benhyk

    And what an amazingly fattening year it was


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaacBanks2

    Was looking for this hahah


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorOrti102185

    Is よくラーメンを食べました and ラーメンをよく食べました different?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Do-Dodonpa

    I'd like to know this as well. I entered the latter and it was considered wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draigyddaear

    Yes, I'd like to know as well. Could it be because を should be followed directly by the verb?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Japanese adverbs are pretty free, so both of those answers should be correct, as long as 今年は was included at the beginning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoS2eL

    I see I have to study English verbs too.

    To me, 'ate' is for a finished period in the past. This year is not a finished period, so I would use 'am eating' or 'have been eating' instead


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draigyddaear

    Unfortunately, studying English verbs won't help you here, because in English (at least in British English) we would say, "I have eaten", because as you rightly point out, the year hasn't finished. We have to remember that the authors of this course are not native English speakers, so sometimes the English is not quite natural.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerrisAlpha

    I wrote "This year I ate lots of ramen". Is there a reason why that is wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

    "This year I often ate ramen" is accepted, as well it should be.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewHai14

    "I've eaten a lot of ramen this year. " Should at least be acceptable.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanessaBod2

    Why is it wrong to say: "This year I ate good ramen"? As I understand, よく can mean both "often" and "good".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    いいラーメン (ii ramen) would mean "good ramen". An adjective right before the noun it is describing should be in its plain form. よく (yoku) would only be an adjective if it was combined with ない to mean "not good".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefanos714672

    Why not "we" in place of "I"? It simply occurred to me first personally, and I do not see why it should not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leslie73939

    The present perfaect tense shoukd be used in English for an incomplete period of time. I have often eaten ramen this year.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draigyddaear

    If using US English, the grammar is fine. In Br English, the sentence would be correct if you've finished with ramen for the year, otherwise, present perfect is required.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aubrey7

    大学生のにおいをする


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

    "I have eaten a lot of ramen this year" not accepted for... arbitrary reasons?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seraphinee

    Lol same. ラメン is best shared with loved ones!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

    Would you use たくさん in place of よく to say "I ate a lot of ramen this year"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chauchat24

    I just confused ramen with America


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaDarkLullaby

    this year i ate often ramen. why it's marked wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhys.whit

    in English, a frequency adverb like "often" can't go in between the verb (ate) and the direct object (ramen). Instead, it should go before the verb or after the direct object. So you could say "I often ate ramen," or "I ate ramen often," but you wouldn't say "I ate often ramen."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaDarkLullaby

    Sorry i forgot this grammar rule. Thanks so much!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanniVwV

    Me during the 2020 quarantine


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fox_Master1

    Who keeps track of that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel260252

    毎年...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Ramen is a specific kind of noodles, so it's correct to call ramen "noodles" in the same way that it's correct to call chicken "meat", but it's not the most precise translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosaVertov1

    My achievements this year

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