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  5. "たまごが好きです。"

"たまごが好きです。"

Translation:I like eggs.

June 25, 2017

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldCrono

So this is how Debbie's line would have gone in the Japanese version of "The Amanda Show".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

Came here for this comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LastStarkgaryen

"I like egg" is grammatically correct and reflects one meaning of this sentence; it should be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeranoJoe

I'd say add "the" to your sentence and you'd be correct. "I like egg" isn't grammatically correct in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benhyk

Even “I like the egg” is a bit odd, colloquially speaking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SparrowPaige

Yeah, there'd have to be a lot of context behind that for it to work, and even in context, it seems a little silly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidme4

'tamago' as in 'tamagotchi', I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmartLatios

I thought the same, and then I looked it up. たまごっち


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I came here for this comment :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

たまご + ともだち = egg-friend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

I thought it was a combo of the words egg and friend but apparently it's a combination of egg and watch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archosta

oh hahaha I see


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattj36

So not "I like an egg" but can it transalte "I like egg"? Just like you would say, i like rice, or I like bread... ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liquorish

Egg as an uncountable is unusual but not wrong or even even uncommon in English. "You've got egg on your face" or "egg and bacon sandwich." You wouldn't talk about eggs in general that way but perhaps the speaker is clarifying their taste in pastries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen

I think you need to either translate it into "I like an egg" or "I like eggs"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tuttar

Does this need to be interpreted as plural 'eggs'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

In Japanese the concept here is to like the type of food "eggs" and it carries no concern about the quantity. In English this sentence can only be interpreted in plural, but not "I like an egg".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rchive2

I think you could translate it as "I like egg," as in egg the substance, not egg the object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelKremer1

Makes more sense in English if you're talking about something like cake. It wouldn't be the same to say "I like cakes" or "I like a cake". "I like cake" is pretty much as literal a translation of ケーキは好きですas you can get.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

"I like egg" is grammatical and possible but only if "egg" is meant as a flavor or a particular ingredient as opposed to other flavors or ingredients. If the meaning is that the speaker enjoys eating eggs, the plural is required for idiomatic English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justanoddone

I like egg should be ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlonsberry

this is totally inconsistant when it comes to singular and plural, a related question 卵は食べ物です。 has a correct answer of egg is a food.

im sick of trying to test out of levels i know with these inconsistencies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arikancelikok

is the egg たま or たまご ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Just the egg itself is たまご, but food with egg in it often drops the ご, as we can call an egg sandwich 玉サンド/たまサンド. However this pattern sometimes refers to totally different things, e.g. 玉ねぎ means Onion (which is actually related because onion is a similar plant to ねぎ/spring onion but onion is round shaped like an egg).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arikancelikok

ありがとうございます!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingo664322

Hi, I'm Debbie. I like eggs!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ichinose2

How could "I like egg... " be wrong!?? if there is no difference between singular and plural noums in japanese!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raijania

eggsactly! I think this has been reported a lot, but they still haven't fixed it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DABurnside

My impression was that tomago were eggs cooked in steam so that the yolks were creamy, and eggu (in katakana probably) were your everyday eggs, cooked every which way Western style. Could someone enlighten me? For instance, what is a raw egg most often called? Arigato.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raijania

not sure about raw egg specifically, but tamago refers to egg in general. fried, steamed, boiled, scrambled, as an ingredient etc. I've never heard of eggu being used personally, tamago is much more common for general use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Op: "I like egg". Duolingo: That's wrong the correct meaning is.. Op: "I like egg, I want egg in my mouth!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmulGarg

The kanji for eggs - 卵 , looks like a boiled egg cut in half :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey439318

Why does the g always sound like an n in "go"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara1190

The voices that Duo (and most learning tools) uses are "standard" Japanese which is based on the Tokyo dialect and has nasal g (ng) sounds. Though not everyone from Tokyo pronounces their g sounds that way, it's more common with older people, and with announcers on tv.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SparrowPaige

Reminds me of that one social experiment video by a guy called Yuta where he goes around surveying westerners in Japan to see if they can speak Japanese, and when one guy is asked what his favourite Japanese food is, he says "watashi wa tamago suuki (sic.) desu."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PawelJania1

Would you like an egg for this trying time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KCNfoster

This line is going in the biography of my life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vclav950324

they call me egg boy

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