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  5. "Ich arbeite den ganzen Tag."

"Ich arbeite den ganzen Tag."

Translation:I work the whole day.

March 23, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S_Bharati

What is the difference between Gesamte and ganzen? Both mean entire/whole in English I suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VahanTerya

Why does "den ganzen Tag" stand in Accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 354

No, it's not an object. It is a phrase that describes time. And for durations as well as for spatial distances pure accusatives (without a preposition) are used in German: example: "Ich fahre drei Wochen in Urlaub" (English has "for three weeks" here), "Ich laufe drei Kilometer" ("I run three kilometers").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinDevl

Because it's the object of the sentence, ich being the subject thereof.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matthewmatic

The English doesn't seem right to me. Is it an American thing? Seems like it needs a 'for' in there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

"I work the whole day" and "I work all day" are both fine in US English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hed_Cyan

Yeah it's an American thing. Brits never work the whole day: they have high tea interrupting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gorn61

It seems OK in British English to me. I quite often use it in the continuous form - "I am working the whole day", but the simple present works for me as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GustavCheng

I'm not a native speaker, but once I asked a friend of mine who is an Aussie he said that yes there should have been a "for" before the whole day (which is also what is taught in ESL) but it's also natural without that "for" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avi_an_Avian

It's a standard elliptical omission so its always there we just speak/write it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

People miss out the "for" but by all means go ahead and include it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lazar.ljubenovic

Which case is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethan.murdoch

den ganzen Tag is in the accusative


[deactivated user]

    So a period of time requires the accusative? Seems odd. You aren't doing something to the day.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
    Mod
    • 354

    Periods of time and distances use the accusative. See my note above.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rolandmac

    You are ruining it by working.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkmag

    Doesn't "the full day" work?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Logicsama

    I thought this happens only in Japan...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasturi846936

    fehrerdef, could, den gesamten Tag be correct too??pls clarify


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
    Mod
    • 354

    It would definitely be understood and it is grammatically correct, but a little unusual (very much like saying "the complete day" in English).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ysduo

    on the railroad


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germanwannabee

    sounds like a mother with 2 year old twins

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