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  5. "かれはちょっとおもいです。"

"かれはちょっとおもいです。"

Translation:He is a little heavy.

June 26, 2017

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyboryxmen

What were they doing carrying a person? :O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jubileena

Maybe they were carrying a heavy baby


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvgeniaCha3

Or maybe they could be yakuza members carrying a corpse!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ekusuplosun

two types of people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaoSquared

Abd even if they weren't actually carrying a person, that's an awfully rude comment!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrvolans

Thats one of the nicer ways of stating it though. Could have been phrased much worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamIp20

Why so mean to guys in this course?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LM0Uxa

He is not cute He is a little heavy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franco_G

He's just big boned! Leave him alone. >:(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

彼はちょっと重いです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

that looks like the kanjis for step and skin put together


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EltonHall1

I'm pretty sure you would say: かれはちょっとふっとています. You can't treat people like objects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I think "omoi" should work if you're picking up a baby and are surprised by how heavy he's gotten. In that case, I don't think you would call the baby fat (ふっとています).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMosuzu

かれはちょっと太って(ふとって)います。 Yes, I think I would say so. If this is not talking about a person but an object, I will use おもい heavy. Actually おもい(重い)means heavy like English expresses. You feel the weight, therefore use 重い. When I saw this sentence, I immediately thought it meant 'He is heavy (like always talks about complicated things therefore he is a bit too much)'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jbscicom

Say no to bullies!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemiMurgos

Dame, BURRI-san! sprinkles with water (I should get a japanese keyboard)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbinero

There is no such thing. Install an IME.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhonfpedroza

Because he's full of love (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ecstaticsinger23

He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkmedellia

I tried "He's a little bit heavy" but it didn't accept it because of the bit part. I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

I had the same problem, after 2 weeks. So sad!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

Does it have a double meaning ? In french we can say someone is "heavy" (lourd), but it means that he's bothering other people. I wonder how we should understand it in japanese...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Omoi" means physically heavy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soy_Jaguar

Physically heavy can imply heavy due to muscles, bone mass, or like compared to what one was expecting -> picking up a fit Shiba Inu and being surprised that it's heavier than expected. -> picking up a baby who has grown a good amount in a short amount of time -> picking someone up who's a good weight, but you're not as strong in the arms as you have to be.

Many uses for this word that have a meaning we don't think of in English is my point ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1GRB
  • 1848

In Russian we can say about a person that he is 'трудный' [trudnyi] (depending on the context it can mean difficult, hard, or heavy) when it's difficult to communicate with him for some reason: he cannot understand you, cannot make concessions etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olfomator

The road is long...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lea584371

I translated it wrong (saying it is a little heavy) because I didnt want to believe that duolingo wants me to write that mean stuff


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Kare" has to be "he", despite your kind intentions. And I don't think this sentence is necessarily mean. If you think about it in the context of picking up a baby or a child, it's just an objective statement. I give my younger Japanese students piggyback rides, but sometimes an older student will want one, too, and when I can barely stand up under their weight, they're not offended by my "omoi yo......."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mawticus

彼は重くない、彼は私の弟です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyCardoso23

What is the last kanji?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reece66734

弟 = おとうと (little brother)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

I think I'm gonna use this in my theme song...
"ソワ二ックさ~~ん!かれはちょっとおもいだ~~!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diazepan11

彼は重くない…兄弟だ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanabi3

Why is "He is a little BIT heavy" wrong??? I don't get it!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lbrunkho

is this the way in we would call a person "thick boned" like calling him fat buy in a more polite not condemning way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soy_Jaguar

Either, but if you were bullying someone it's waaay more likely you'd just use a word like: でぶ ふとい ブタ(lit means pig, someone who eats like or acts like one) デクデク(especially when they're running or moving :( ) ぶっとい(do not use this one, even as a joke) むくむく(but this means stature, not always health, i.e. a furry cat could technically be あぶらぶとり


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soy_Jaguar

Oh wait, i misunderstood your question. Okay, that list is of ways not to say that, i would assume you could use よ like... 「あなたの骨は重いだよ。。。」or 「あなた、驚いたことに重いですよ」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginsneng

can I replace "little" with "kind of" or is that another sentence entirely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthia917460

I really hate it when they split words like that. At least, I wish they would split them between a prefix or suffix and the root word. I wish they would keep the particles separate from other words, too. Japanese is tough enough as it is, for pity's sake.

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